Mir, Thomson sit atop UFC Fight Night 71 salaries

July 21, 2015

MMA Junkie reports the disclosed salaries from Wednesday’s UFC Fight Night 71.  Frank Mir headed the list of fighters making $200,000.

Mir defeated Todd Duffee in the first round.  Mir did not receive a win bonus.  Duffee made $20,000 for his part in the main event.

Via MMA Junkie:

Frank Mir: $200,000 (no win bonus) 886,000
def. Todd Duffee: $12,000

Tony Ferguson: $60,000 (includes $30,000 win bonus)
def. Josh Thomson: $85,000

Holly Holm: $50,000 (includes $25,000 win bonus)
def. Marion Reneau: $12,000

Manny Gamburyan: $60,000 (includes $30,000 win bonus)
def. Scott Jorgensen: $33,000

Kevin Lee: $36,000 (includes $18,000 win bonus)
def. James Moontasri: $10,000

Alan Jouban: $30,000 (includes $15,000 win bonus)
def. Matt Dwyer: $10,000

Sam Sicilia: $36,000 (includes $18,000 win bonus)
def. Yaotzin Meza: $16,000

Jessica Andrade: $32,000 (includes $16,000 win bonus)
def. Sarah Moras: $10,000

Rani Yahya: $54,000 (includes $27,000 win bonus)
def. Masanori Kanehara: $14,000

Sean Strickland: $34,000 (includes $17,000 win bonus)
def. Igor Araujo: $15,000

Kevin Casey: $20,000 (includes $10,000 win bonus)
def. Ildemar Alcantara: $20,000

Lyman Good: $20,000 (includes $10,000 win bonus)
def. Andrew Craig: $17,000

Payout Perspective:

Mir’s $200K flat appears to be his standard pay at this point.  Thomson’s $85K was second on the pay roster for last week.  Notably, Holly Holm’s first UFC fight at UFC 184 was at $25K/$25K.  She made the same on Wednesday.

UFC 189: Payout Perspective

July 16, 2015

Welcome to another edition of Payout Perspective.  This time we take you to UFC 189 which was the biggest event in years for the company taking place at the MGM Grand Garden Arena.

McGregor wins interim Featherweight title

The gamble for the UFC paid off.  Conor McGregor stopped Chad Mendes with just seconds remaining in the second round to win the interim Featherweight title.  McGregor was in trouble early as he could not stop takedowns and was being held down by Mendes.  But, McGregor was able to escape a guillotine attempt and used his power to KO Mendes.

McGregor actually has a coaching spot on TUF this fall and then it’s likely Jose Aldo.  Mendes showed well for himself considering he did not have a full camp.  He is still at the top of the list of challengers for the Featherweight title.

The (Interim) Champ - Via Wikimedia Commons

The (Interim) Champ – Via Wikimedia Commons

Lawler outlasts MacDonald in bloody war

It was the best fight in some time and likely a prime example of why this sport can never gain mainstream acceptance.  Robbie Lawler’s lip and Rory MacDonald’s nose exemplified the dedication, discipline, heart and fearlessness it takes to make it to the top of this sport.  Although MacDonald was ahead on the judge’s cards, he succumbed to the pain and crumpled to the mat in the fifth round after another shot from Lawler.

Lawler-MacDonald scorecard

For Lawler, Johny Hendricks seems like the next opponent for Lawler.  Many have said that this fight may have changed the trajectory of MacDonald’s career forever.  We shall see.

Attendance and gate

It was the biggest attendance and gate for a UFC event ever since UFC 129 in Toronto.  Attendance stood at 16,019 for a gate of $7.2 million.  Dana White stated that ticket sales actually surged after Jose Aldo pulled out of the fight getting the gate over $7 million.

On the secondary market the “get in” price at the start of the Fight Pass Prelims was $665.  According to Darren Rovell, the median price paid on Stubhub was $500 which was the highest since Silva-Sonnen II ($450).

Bonuses

Conor McGregor, Thomas Almeida, Rory MacDonald and Robbie Lawler earned the $50,000 bonuses.

Salaries

McGregor and Mendes topped the salaries making $500,000 each.  The full list is here.

Promotion of the Fight

The promotion of the fight started with the expensive and well-chronicled world tour with Jose Aldo and Conor McGregor.  The Embedded episodes were entertaining as those occurred this past spring.  Most of us were hoping that July would come soon.  Of course, the fight did not happen and we were given Chad Mendes.   More Embedded episodes occurred to promote the fight and even some controversy as it appeared that an episode featuring Conor training in wrestling was edited out.  The theory was that it would give Mendes some advantage.

Dana White appeared on ESPN, the Jim Rome and other outlets.  Notably, he stated in a radio interview that Aldo would have made $4 million at UFC 189.  He also stated on Jim Rome that McGregor wanted to bet him $3 million that he would knock out Mendes.  Apparently, he knew what he was talking about.

Sponsorships

This was the first event where Reebok uniforms were exclusively used.  Overall, it was not as bad as I had thought although I am sure there are some fight fans that will miss the aesthetic of different sponsors on the shorts as well as fight banners.

The official UFC sponsors were in the Octagon including the movie “SouthPaw,” Draft Kings, Toyo Tires, Harley Davidson, Fram,Bud Light, Corn Nuts, Metro PCS, Musclepharm and Monster Energy Drink had the center.

Reebok presented the Embedded  episodes featuring McGregor and Mendes.

In addition to announcing an individual deal with Reebok, Rory MacDonald had a Monster logo on its shorts.  Same for Conor McGregor. McGregor also starred in a commercial for Game of War.

Toyo Tires also sponsored Chad Mendes and sent out an eblast about the challenger.

Although it was announced in early June, the UFC announced a partnership with Las Vegas Monorail making it the “Official Las Vegas Transportation of the UFC.”  While this seems silly, the fact that so many people from out of town (especially Irish McGregor supporters) likely took it as a method of transportation probably made the sponsorship worth its while.

Odds and ends

The changes in production were subtle but great.  While there might be a lot of criticism about spending 6 months and who knows how much money to change the “C” in the UFC, the presentation at the weigh-ins and the actual show were top-notch.

The live singing entrances for the main events were an interesting touch.

It was interesting that this fight was not offered in movie theatres like other events before it.

One critique about new UFC production, rounds now noted by filled in marks like balls/strikes in baseball.  I like numbers to tell me rounds.

The uplighting and other stage enhancements for the weigh-ins were great.  It gave UFC 189 that big fight feel.  Of course, the atmosphere with so many Irish there made it feel that much more electric on television.

This was the first event with the USADA drug testing protocol.

It appears that cutmen have lost their sponsor deals when Reebok took over this month but are not a part of the Reebok deal.  We will see where this goes.

Mendes has been stopped in two championship fights with seconds left in a round.

I already booked my hotel for UFC 200 which will be in the new MGM-AEG Arena July 2, 2016

Conclusion

Much has been scrutinized about what the PPV buy rate will be for UFC 189.  Despite Aldo pulling out late, it appears that it did not hurt PPV sales.  The pre-buys for the event appear to be strong which is based on the number of people that purchase the PPV prior to the day of the PPV.  The google searches appear strong but the Prelim rating was under 1 million viewers.  So, we shall see.  My gut reaction is that the PPV did between 550K and 600K buys which solidifies McGregor as a legitimate PPV star.

Invicta FC 13 and TUF Finale 21 payouts

July 13, 2015

MMA Junkie reports the payouts from the Invicta FC 13 show on Thursday and TUF Finale 21 Sunday.  Cristiane “Cyborg” Justino and Jake Ellenberger topped the payrolls on their respective nights.

The payouts were disclosed by the Nevada State Athletic Commission.

Invicta FC 13 payouts:

Champ Cristiane Justino: $100,000 (includes $50,000 win bonus)
def. Faith Van Duin: $6,000

Tonya Evinger: $11,000 (includes $5,500 win bonus)
def. Irene Aldana: $5,000

Champ Ayaka Hamasaki: $10,000 (includes $5,000 win bonus)
def. Herica Tiburcio: $5,500

Pannie Kianzad: $6,000 (includes $3,000 win bonus)
def. Jessica-Rose Clark: $2,000

Amber Brown: $4,000 (includes $2,000 win bonus)
def. Catherine Costigan: $2,000

Jamie Moyle: $4,000 (includes $2,000 win bonus)
def. Amy Montenegro: $2,000

Amber Leibrock: $2,000 (includes $1,000 win bonus)
def. Marina Shafir: $2,500

TUF 21 Finale payouts:

Stephen Thompson: $42,000 (includes $21,000 win bonus)
def. Jake Ellenberger: $73,000

Kamaru Usman: $20,000 (includes $10,000 win bonus)
def. Hayder Hassan: $10,000

Michael Graves: $20,000 (includes $10,000 win bonus)
def. Vicente Luque: $10,000

Jorge Masvidal: $102,000 (includes $51,000 win bonus)
def. Cezar Ferreira: $20,000

Michelle Waterson: $30,000 (includes $15,000 win bonus)
def. Angela Magana: $10,000

Maximo Blanco: $41,400 (includes $23,000 win bonus)*
def. Mike De La Torre: $17,600*

Josh Samman: $20,000 (includes $10,000 win bonus)
def. Caio Magalhaes: $20,000

Jerrod Sanders: $20,000 (includes $10,000 win bonus)
def. Russell Doane: $11,000

Trevor Smith: $34,000 (includes $17,000 win bonus)
def. Dan Miller: $25,000

George Sullivan: $30,000 (includes $15,000 win bonus)
def. Dominic Waters: $10,000

Willie Gates: $20,000 (includes $10,000 win bonus)
def. Darrell Montague: $ 10,000

According to MMA Junkie, Maximo Blanco was fined 20 percent of his purse for missing weight and the fine went to Mike De La Torre.  Perhaps fitting considering it appeared that the fight ended too early due to ref stoppage.

Payout Perspective:

There does not appear to be anything too out of the ordinary from the payouts.  Certainly, Cyborg is getting paid much more than the rest of the Invicta FC roster since she is being prepped for a UFC run.  She is making $50K/$50K when the next highest paid fighter is making just $6,000.  Ellenberger at $73,000 should be highlighted as he might be close to being either let go or asked to renegotiate contract.

McGregor-Mendes top payouts for UFC 189

July 13, 2015

MMA Fighting reports the salaries from Saturday night’s UFC 189.  Conor McGregor and Chad Mendes made $500,000 each for their main event fight.

Notably, McGregor did not have a win bonus although it’s being reported that he is receiving a part of the PPV sales.  Thus, the speculation is that he’ll clear $3-$4 million after all is said and done.  Mendes may receive a part of the PPV cut as well.  Mendes signed a new 8-fight deal with the UFC in May.

The salaries were disclosed by the Nevada State Athletic Commission.  The reported salaries do not include bonuses, Reebok sponsorship money or any other discretionary bonuses.  Notably, Jeremy Stephens forfeited 20% of his purse due to not making weight.

The total reported salaries for UFC 189 was $1,952,000.

Via MMA Fighting:

Conor McGregor ($500,000) def. Chad Mendes ($500,000)

Robbie Lawler ($150,000 + $150,000 = $300,000) def. Rory MacDonald ($59,000)

Jeremy Stephens ($32,000 + $40,000 = $72,000) def. Dennis Bermudez ($34,000)

Gunnar Nelson ($29,000 + $29,000 = $58,000) def. Brandon Thatch ($22,000)

Thomas Almeida ($12,000 + $12,000 = $24,000) def. Brad Pickett ($30,000)

Matt Brown ($46,000 + $46,000 = $92,000) def. Tim Means ($23,000)

Alex Garcia ($15,000 + $15,000 = $30,000) def. Mike Swick ($48,000)

John Howard ($21,000 + $21,000 = $42,000) def. Cathal Pendred ($10,000)

Cody Garbrandt ($10,000 + $10,000 = $20,000) def. Henry Briones ($10,000)

Louis Smolka ($15,000 + $15,000 = $30,000) def. Neil Seery ($15,000)

Cody Pfister ($10,000 + $10,000 = $20,000) def. Yosdenis Cedeno ($13,000)

Payout Perspective:

Interesting that Robbie Lawler at $300K and Rory MacDonald at $59K plus his $50 Fight of the Night bonus were the only other fighters to reach 6 figures.  The average fighter payout was $88,000 although much of that was the $1 million combined from McGregor-Mendes.  In fact, if you take out the payouts from the top two fights, the average salary drops to $33,000.

Despite loss, Machida tops UFC Fight Night salaries

June 29, 2015

MMA Junkie reports the disclosed salaries from Saturday night UFC Fight Night 70.  Lyoto Machida earned 1/3 of the total reported payouts drawing $200,000 in his loss to Yoel Romero.

Via MMA Junkie:

Yoel Romero: $66,000 (includes $33,000 win bonus)
def. Lyoto Machida: $200,000

Lorenz Larkin: $66,000 (includes $33,000 win bonus)
def. Santiago Ponzinibbio: $10,000

Antonio Carlos Junior: $34,000 (includes $17,000 win bonus)
def. Eddie Gordon: $15,000

Thiago “Marreta” Santos: $32,000 (includes $16,000 win bonus)
def. Steve Bosse: $10,000

Hacran Dias: $26,000 (includes $13,000 win bonus)
def. Levan Makashvili: $12,000

Alex Oliveira: $24,000 (includes $12,000 win bonus)
def. Joe Merritt: $10,000

Leandro Silva: $28,000 (includes $13,000 win bonus)*
def. Lewis Gonzalez: $8,000

Tony Sims: $20,000 (includes $10,000 win bonus)
def. Steve Montgomery: $10,000

Sirwan Kakai: $20,000 (includes $10,000 win bonus)
def. Danny Martinez : $10,000

The total disclosed payroll was $601,000

Payout Perspective:

Gonzalez was docked 20% of his fight purse for not making weight.  Machida’s payout is on par what he has been receiving although the 37-year old may be heading toward the downside of his career (and his pay).  Romero and Larkin were the next two highest paid on Saturday earning $33K and $33K.

Mayweather, Pacquiao top annual list of highest paid athletes

June 11, 2015

Forbes announced its annual list of highest paid athletes.  As expected, boxer Floyd Mayweather, Jr. topped the list earning $300 million including endorsement deals.  His opponent, May 2nd, Manny Pacquiao landed second on the list.

Mayweather tallied $285 million in pay from June 2014 to June 2015.  He earned $100 million on fight night against Pacquiao but the revenue does not include PPV (which were an astronomical 4.4 million buys), gate ($73 million) and fight sponsorships ($13 million).  According to Forbes, the fight is expected to gross $600 million once the dust settles.  For his May fight, he also earned another $15 million in sponsorship money from Hublot, FanDuel and Burger King.  Mayweather’s earnings also include his September 2014 fight with Marcus Maidana.

Pacquiao landed second on the list earning $160 million.  The earnings include his November 2014 fight in Macau against Chris Algieri.  Pacquiao earned $125 million in pay from the Mayweather fight and $23 million from his Algieri fight.  He drew $148 in pay and drew $12 million in endorsements from a variety of sponsors including Nike, Foot Locker, Wonderful Pistachios, Nestle’s Butterfinger and a variety of Filipino sponsors.  Prior to the event, it was reported that Pacquiao would garner $2.25 million from sponsors on his trunks alone.

It’s the third time Mayweather has topped the list and his earnings set the record for athlete earnings in a year.  Tiger Woods earned $115 million in 2008 which was the previous record.

Wladimir Klitschko made the Forbes Top 100 paid athletes at #63 making $22.5 million.  There were no MMA fighters on the list.

Payout Perspective:

The list reflects the fact that boxing’s top stars command the most money.  Overall, the sport of boxing may not pay all of its fighters well, but the earning power of Mayweather and Pacquiao show that the sport is still a draw when there are big fights.  The money made by Mayweather this year is based on the split in revenue from the Pacquiao fight in which he controlled a dominant share of the money drawn from the event.  It’s unlikely we’ll see another athlete earn this much money in a 12 month span for a long time.

Johnson, Weidman top UFC 187 salaries

May 26, 2015

The Nevada State Athletic Commission released the salaries from Saturday’s UFC 187.  Notably, Chris Weidman and Anthony Johnson received $500,000 each for their respective fights.

Via MMA Junkie:

Daniel Cormier: $180,000 (includes $90,000 win bonus)
def. Anthony Johnson: $500,000

Chris Weidman: $500,000 (includes $250,000 win bonus)
def. Vitor Belfort: $300,000

Donald Cerrone: $152,000 (includes $76,000 win bonus)
def. John Makdessi: $30,000

Andrei Arlovski: $84,000 (includes $42,000 win bonus)
def. Travis Browne: $60,000

Joseph Benavidez: $106,000 (includes $53,000 win bonus)
def. John Moraga: $28,000

John Dodson: $40,000 (includes $20,000 win bonus)
def. Zach Makovsky: $19,000

Dong Hyun Kim: $116,000 (includes $58,000 win bonus)
def. Josh Burkman: $45,000

Rafael Natal: $70,000 (includes $35,000 win bonus)
def. Uriah Hall: $14,000

Colby Covington: $24,000 (includes $12,000 win bonus)
def. Mike Pyle: $51,000

Islam Makhachev: $20,000 (includes $10,000 win bonus)
def. Leo Kuntz: $10,000

Justin Scoggins: $30,000 (includes $15,000 win bonus)
def. Josh Sampo: $13,000

According to MMA Junkie, Rose Namajunas received her show and win pay despite her fight with Nina Ansaroff being cancelled.  Namajunas received $50,000 plus $2,000 from Ansaroff’s purse due to her missing weight.  Not only was Ansaroff sick, but she missed weight and was fined her show money of $8,000.  Thus, she received $6,000.

Payout Perspective:

It’s unbelievable to see Johnson receive $500,000 for his fight against Cormier.  This makes him the highest paid fighter of the night if you consider Weidman is making $250K/$250K.  Johnson just signed a new contract and he steps up big-time in pay.  His last contract had him at $53k/$53K.  Not clear if this new deal is a flat fee (i.e., no win bonus) but it is sure to make other fighters up for a new contract take notice.  Aside from Johnson and Weidman, Vitor Belfort, Daniel Cormier, Donald Cerrone, Joseph Benavidez and Dong Hyun Kim earned six figures on Saturday.

UFC to change Reebok pay structure to tiered system

April 20, 2015

Sports Business Journal reports (subscription recommended) that the UFC is making a change to the way it will compensate its fighters through the Reebok deal.  Instead of paying fighters based on media rankings, it will pay fighters based on a “tiered system” based on tenure or number of UFC bouts fought.

There will be 5 tiers based on the number of fights an individual has had with the UFC.  The article indicates that the UFC will count fights with the WEC and Strikeforce into the number of fights an individual has fought with the organization. There will be tiers of 1-5 fights, 6-10 fights, 11-15 fights, 16-20 fights and more than 21 fights according to the article.

Title fights will be an exception to this rule as the fighters will receive greater compensation.  The UFC declined comment on sharing the amount of money each tier would receive.

The change is based on speaking with fighters and managers about the new Reebok deal according to UFC senior vice president of global consumer products, Tracey Bleczinksi.

The article includes quotes from Glenn Robinson of Authentic Sports Management and Ronda Rousey’s manager Brad Slater.  Robinson indicated that the sponsorship money has dried up over the years and that the Reebok deal is “more sustainable.”  Slater acknowledged that despite the number of sponsors a fighter may have, the total money earned was not “a really significant number.”

Payout Perspective:

The new “tiered” system appears to be a much more fair system than the media rankings which were widely criticized.  The system which rewards a fighter based on time served in the UFC (or WEC or Strikeforce) is a much more stable way of determining how a fighter will be compensated through the Reebok deal.  It also gives a fighter incentive to do their best to stay in the UFC.  Still, the unknown is how much a fighter will be paid through the deal.  The UFC does leave itself an out as the policy allows it to pay fighters more in championship bouts (e.g. McGregor at UFC 189).

The article points out that the change was based on discussions with fighters and their managers about the deal.  It’s interesting that these discussions happened now and not during the time prior to the Reebok announcement.  The new change should give a fighter more certainty as to what tier they are in and an expectancy as to how much they should receive from Reebok.

System set in payouts for Mayweather-Pacquiao

April 18, 2015

The New York Times reported on the unusual need for a central system to be used for the logistical payouts for Manny Pacquiao and Floyd Mayweather with respect to the long-awaited fight coming May 2nd.

The article primarily relies on quotes from Pacquiao promoter Bob Arum with respect to how the gross revenues will be divided between the two fighters and other ancillary entities.

For Pacquiao, he is on the wrong-end of a 60-40 revenue split but should clear over $100 million when all is said and done. Of course, the IRS will take its share from Pacquiao (and Mayweather we assume) right off the top.

Rival networks, HBO and Showtime are co-producing and co-distributing the PPV event. They have dueling shoulder programs on its respective networks and in a unique production agreement, each of the networks’ broadcast teams will participate in the event (including dueling ring announcers). The two sides have created a central accounting system to ensure what one might believe is “integrity” in splitting the revenues from what should be the biggest event in boxing history (at least from a gross profits standpoint).

The central system will distribute the revenue in accordance with the contracts of the two fighters.

All revenue from the fight would be put into the central accounting system. This would include foreign broadcast rights, closed-circuit income, ticket sales, sponsorships, merchandise sales, etc. The estimate of these monies per the NYT is at $130 million. In addition, PPV revenue which could gross $300 million also goes into this pot.

Most of the PPV revenue will go to the fighters minus 15% (7.5% each for HBO and Showtime). You may recall that HBO and Showtime were in vigorous negotiations with the satellite and cable companies regarding the PPV distribution for the event.

A “wrinkle” pointed out by Arum is that the winner of the fight will receive a 51-49 percent split for revenue between $160 million and $180 million. Thus, ideally the winner will receive $10.2 million while the loser gets $9.8 million. The amount over $180 million reverts to the 60-40 split in favor of Mayweather.

Payout Perspective:

Despite the lofty price point for this PPV, it is believed it should break the PPV record. Similarly, the $72 million gate at the MGM will break a record as well. One might assume the same for international rights, closed-circuit money, sponsorships and merchandise. It’s clear that the logistics for splitting up the revenues required a central system (we assume with necessary checks, balances and protocols).

Brooks tops Bellator 136 salaries

April 15, 2015

MMA Fighting reports the Bellator 136 salaries which were disclosed by the California State Athletic Comission.  Lightweight champion Will Brooks was the top paid fighter earning $72,000.

Brooks, who earned $36,000 for show and $36,000 for the win, successfully defended his title against Dave Jansen who made $12,000.  The event took place Friday at the Bren Events Center in Irvine, California.

Via MMA Fighting:

Will Brooks: ($36,000 + $36,000 = $72,000) def. Dave Jansen ($12,000)
Rafael Carvalho ($4,000 + $4,000 = $8,000) def. Joe Schilling ($27,000)
Marcin Held ($13,000 + $13,000 = $26,000) def. Alexander Sarnavskiy($11,000)
Tony Johnson ($8,000 + $8,000 = $16,000) def. Alexander Volkov($10,000)

John Teixeira ($4,000 + $4,000 = $8,000) def. Fabricio Guerreiro($8,000)
Saad Awad ($10,000 + $10,000 = $20,000) def. Rob Sinclair ($8,000)
Joey Beltran ($10,000 + $10,000 = $20,000) def. Brian Rogers ($10,000)
AJ McKee ($1,500 + $1,5000 = $3,000) def. Marcos Bonilla ($1,000)
Chad George ($1,500 + $1,500 = $3,000) def. Mark Vorgeas ($2,000)
Justin Goverale ($1,000 + $1,000 = $2,000) def. Jay Bogan ($1,500)
Steve Ramirez ($1,000 + $1,000 = $2,000) def. Jonathan Santa Maria($2,500)
Chris Herrera ($1,500) vs. Luc Bondole ($1,500) (DRAW)
Cleber Luciano ($3,000 + $3,000 = $6,000) def. Aaron Miller ($2,000)

Payout Perspective:

Clearly Bellator pay is much less than UFC pay.  Brooks’ base of $36,000 is on par with recent payouts of lightweights Joe Lauzon’s at UFC 183 and Danny Castillo at UFC 182.  Of course, there are other fighters on the UFC roster that make a higher base than Brooks.   Schilling made $27,000 in his loss which was the second highest show purse on the card.

Next Page »