UFC 202: Payout Perspective

August 23, 2016

Welcome to another edition of Payout Perspective for UFC 202.  This time we take a look at Diaz-McGregor II at the T-Mobile Arena in Las Vegas, Nevada.

McGregor gains revenge on Diaz

It was a majority decision for Conor McGregor as 2 judges scored the bout for McGregor while the third judge determined it a draw.  It was a solid back and forth fight with McGregor coming out with a solid game plan but despite a crimson mask, Diaz came back and was able to score a 10-8 round (according to 1 judge).  McGregor seemed to tire after round 2 as he attempted to run from exchanges.  However, he was able to muster enough to narrowly escape a second loss to Diaz.

The question of when the third fight shall happen will likely depend on when McGregor will be available as an injured leg may keep him out until 2017.  Could we see Diaz-McGregor III in Vegas in July 2017?

Conor McGregor and Nate Diaz represented 82 percent of the reported salary payouts which we detail below.  A definite money fight.

Anrhony Johnson drops Glover

It took one uppercut for Anthony Johnson to end the night for Glover Teixeira.  Johnson should get Daniel Cormier next.  Johnson is on a roll and it looks like Cormier will need to rely on his wrestling to stop Rumble’s power.  This could be one of the main events for the UFC’s debut in New York this November.

Attendance and gate

Although there were reports that the event had trouble selling tickets, it still was a big gate for the UFC.  It drew 15,539 for a live gate of $7,692,010 at the T-Mobile Arena in Las Vegas, Nevada.  A typical McGregor draw.

UFC 196: 14,697 for $8.1M

UFC 194: 16,516 for $10.1M

UFC 189: 16,019 for $7.2M

Ticket prices were slashed for the event per ESPN.  There were still tickets available the day of the event.

Bonuses

The $50,000 bonuses went to Conor McGregor, Nate Diaz, Anthony Johnson and Donald Cerrone.  Diaz-McGregor earned FOTN while Johnson and Cerrone drew POTN.  There were a lot of stoppages to choose from and there could have been several fighters that could have drawn the bonuses.

Payouts

Conor McGregor made history by making the most of any reported payout for an MMA fighter when the NSAC disclosed he would receive $3 million for the fight.  Diaz came in second in payouts with $2 million.  The two drew over 80% of the reported overall payouts.

The full list is here.

Promotion of the Fight

The Pre-Fight Press Conference was a spectacle with bottle throwing and middle fingers everywhere.  With McGregor showing up late, it seemed to make Diaz mad as he got up and left and that’s when the presser went off the rails.


Also of note, Nate Diaz appeared on Conan and Jimmy Kimmel.

Conor McGregor did not do as many appearances but did another CNBC interview.

He also did an ESPN interview post-water bottle throwing and the censors were too slow to catch up with some profanity.

There was also a GQ profile on McGregor.

The promotion of the fight included twitter emojis for Diaz and McGregor when you used their hashtags.  Other fighters and famous folks did videos on twitter holding up the hashtag of they believed would win the fight.

The UFC 196 replay featuring Diaz-McGregor I was shown on FS1 Thursday night before the fight and drew over 200,000 viewers despite Olympics and NFL Preseason on the same night.  The first fight was available for free online too.

The UFC weigh-ins drew 173,000 viewers on Friday night and was followed by a replay of the “Bad Blood” special on Diaz-Conor which drew 162,000 viewers.

Sponsorships

The regular UFC sponsors were in the octagon including MetroPCS, Toyo Tires, Harley Davidson, Bud Light, 7-Eleven, UFC Fight Pass and Monster Energy Drink had the center of the octagon.  The movie “Hands of Stone,” which is about the Roberto Duran-Sugar Ray Leonard fight.  Bud Light had the fighter prep point.

The octagon also included the twitter hashtags for Nate Diaz and Conor McGregor.

Conor McGregor, who has an individual sponsorship with Reebok, did posts and a video for Reebok promoting himself and UFC 202.

Donald Cerrone had a Monster Energy Drink logo and Bud Light sponsorship on his shorts.  He also held the Monster can post-fight after  his stoppage of Rick Story.

Odds and Ends

No “Face the Pain” music intro to the PPV.  Perhaps a call by the new owners.

Conor McGregor claimed that he spent $300,000 on his training camp in preparation for Nate Diaz.  That’s 10% of his reported payout for his fight with Diaz.

Cerrone said that it was his last fight on his contract but his reps stated otherwise.  Regardless, he seemed set on re-signing with the UFC instead of testing free agency.

Despite the payout for Nate, Nick remains suspended due to the fact he has yet to pay his fine from the settlement with the commission.  As a result, he was banned from the arena and precluded from cornering Nate.

We’ll probably talk about Nate and his post-fight vaping later this week.

The Dominick Cruz-Alpha Male feud continues as Cody Carbrandt stopped Takeya Mizugaki in the first round.  Cruz stopped Mizugaki in the first round in his return from injury.  Post-fight Carbrandt turned his attention to Cruz who was in the FS1 booth.

Was that Eva Marie or Rando Markos with the red hair?

New thing for fighters.  They get to see tweets in the locker rooms:

Mike Perry may be the most-hated UFC fighter already.  Not only did he fake a handshake with his opponent at the televised weigh-ins.  There is audio of his corner possibly using racial slurs.  This, in addition to having a long fingernail going into the Octagon and then, without a clipper in site, he attempted to chew it off.

Gordon Ramsey, Skip Bayless, Dwight Howard and Kanye West were all in attendance at UFC 202.

It was Neil Magny’s last fight on his contract but his upset loss to Lorenz Larking probably does not help his cause when negotiating with the UFC.

No post-fight press conference as fighters had individual scrums.  A sign of the times for the new ownership?

The Pro Fighter’s Association held a press conference in Vegas during fight week to establish its potential roll in a fighter’s union for the UFC.  It will be a long, hard road for this to happen but we shall see.

Conclusion

5 million google searches on Saturday for UFC 202 might infer that the PPV buy rate will soar over 1M buys.  Certainly, the lack of tickets sales may be a concern but realize that the UFC moved into T-Mobile Arena versus most of their other big events taking place at the MGM Grand Garden Arena.  T-Mobile holds more people so maybe the UFC overestimated the attendance.  While the event seemed to lack the buzz of a typical McGregor fight, it will still produce PPV buy rates.  I would expect this event to hit 1M buys.

McGregor, Diaz draw over 80% of reported payouts for UFC 202

August 22, 2016

MMA Junkie reports the full roster of disclosed payouts from Saturday’s UFC 202.  The main event accounted for 82% of the reported payouts from the Nevada State Athletic Commission.

As previously reported, Conor McGregor earned $3 million (no bonus) and Nate Diaz earned $2 million (no bonus).  While there was no bonus associated with their purse, the two won a $50,000 bonus for their epic fight.

The rest of the card is as follows:

Conor McGregor: $3 million (no win bonus)
def. Nate Diaz: $2 million

Anthony Johnson: $270,000 (includes $135,000 win bonus)
def. Glover Teixeira: $65,000

Donald Cerrone: $170,000 (includes $85,000 win bonus)
def. Rick Story: $41,000

Mike Perry: $20,000 (includes $10,000 win bonus)
def. Hyun Gyu Lim: $18,000

Tim Means: $62,000 (includes $31,000 win bonus)
def. Sabah Homasi: $12,000

Cody Garbrandt: $54,000 (includes $27,000 win bonus)
def. Takeya Mizugaki: $39,000

Raquel Pennington: $46,000 (includes $23,000 win bonus)
def. Elizabeth Phillips: $12,000

Artem Lobov: $26,000 (includes $13,000 win bonus)
def. Chris Avila: $10,000

Cortney Casey: $40,000 (includes $20,000 win bonus)
def. Randa Markos: $14,000

Lorenz Larkin: $78,000 (includes $39,000 win bonus)
def. Neil Magny: $47,000

Colby Covington: $42,000 (includes $21,000 win bonus)
def. Max Griffin: $10,000

Marvin Vettori: $20,000 (includes $10,000 win bonus)
def. Alberto Uda: $10,000

Payout Perspective:

The biggest disclosed payday for an MMA fighter goes to McGregor.  Of course, this does not include any discretionary bonuses or PPV points he may receive from the PPV.  It’s estimated that 202 likely hit 1M PPV buys (unconfirmed) so it was a good return for McGregor.  Anthony Johnson earned third highest on the card including his Performance of the Night Bonus and Donald Cerrone (at the end of his fight contract) earned $220,000 including his Performance of the Night Bonus.

McGregor payday $3M, Diaz $2M at UFC 202

August 20, 2016

The Nevada State Athletic Commission has disclosed that main event participants will receive $5 million for their fight tonight at UFC 202.  Conor McGregor will receive a UFC record $3 million and Nate Diaz will earn $2 million.

The $3 million will be the highest-reported amount given to a UFC fighter in the company’s history.  Yes, we know about the undisclosed payouts fighters receive but this is the highest amount disclosed to the commission.

Anthony Johnson is reported to make $135,000 to show and another $135,000 as a win bonus.  Glover Teixeira will make $65,000 and another $65,000 if he wins.  Donald Cerrone is set to make $85,000 and $85,000 win bonus.

As for the rest of the card, this:


Payout Perspective:

McGregor made a reported $1M at UFC 196 and the $3M payout (no win bonus) out-earns Brock Lesnar.  The WWE pro-wrestler made $2.5M at UFC 200.  Diaz earns a raise of  at least $1.5M from his win this past March.  Despite his loss, the UFC still believes that McGregor is a top-of-the-card draw.

Moraes tops WSOF 32 salaries

August 3, 2016

MMA Fighting reports the salaries from WSOF 32 this past Saturday in Everett, Washington.  WSOF headliner Marlon Moraes topped the salaries with $180,000.

The salaries were disclosed by the Washington State Department of Licensing.

Via MMA Fighting:

Marlon Moraes ($90,000 + $90,000 = $180,000) def. Josh Hill ($10,000)
Lance Palmer ($28,000 + $28,000 = $56,000) def. Alexandre Almeida ($12,000)
Caros Fodor* ($18,000 + $15,000 = $33,000) def. Phoenix Jones* ($12,000)
Louis Taylor ($6,000 + $6,000 = $12,000) def. Phil Hawes ($5,000)

Hakeem Dawodu ($6,000 + $6,000 = $12,000) def. Marat Magomedov ($3,000)
Rex Harris ($3,000 + $3,000 = $6,000) def. Nicolai Salchow ($3,000)
Andrews Nakahara ($4,000 + $4,000 = $8,000) def. Travis Doerge ($1,500)
Matt Kovacs ($1,000 + $1,000 = $2,000) def. Bill Widler ($1,500)
Brett Malone ($750 + $750 = $1,500) def. Patrick Benson ($750)
Matt Coble ($1,000 + $1,000 = $2,000) def. Colt Hausauer ($700)
Tycen Lynn ($1,000 + $1,000 = $2,000) def. Justin Hugo ($1,000)
Joe Elzea ($1,000 + $1,000 = $2,000) def. Marcos Lopez ($1,000)

*Fodor received 20-percent of Jones’ purses due to Jones missing weight

Payout Perspective:

The payouts reflect the issue with pay among fighters.  Moraes, who the WSOF will want to keep to help attract fans is at the top of the company pay scale making $90K/$90K.  Two fighters (Benson and Hausauer) made $750 and $700 respectively.  It was Benson’s second pro fight.  It was Hausauer’s eighth pro fight although the first with a major organization.  I am not sure what to make of these payouts.  Either WSOF does not have the capital to pay all of its fighters or we should not consider WSOF a major MMA organization.

Lawler and Woodley top UFC 201 payouts

August 1, 2016

MMA Junkie reports the payouts from this past Saturday’s UFC 201.  The headliners drew the top pay for the card.

The payouts were disclosed by the Georgia Athletic and Entertainment Commission.

Via Junkie:

Tyron Woodley: $340,000 (includes $70,000 win bonus)
def. Robbie Lawler: $500,000

Karolina Kowalkiewicz: $38,000 (includes $19,000 win bonus)
def. Rose Namajunas: $46,000

Jake Ellenberger: $150,000 (includes $75,000 win bonus)
def. Matt Brown: $73,000

Erik Perez: $48,000 (includes $24,000 win bonus)
def. Francisco Rivera: $23,000

Ryan Benoit: $26,000 (includes $13,000 win bonus)
def. Fredy Serrano: $12,000

Nikita Krylov: $48,000 (includes $24,000 win bonus)
def. Ed Herman: $51,000

Jorge Masvidal: $114,000 (includes $57,000 win bonus)
def. Ross Pearson: $54,000

Anthony Hamilton: $32,000 (includes $16,000 win bonus)
def. Damian Grabowski: $18,000

Wilson Reis: $50,000 (includes $25,000 win bonus)
def. Hector Sandoval: $12,000

Michael Graves: $12,000
vs. Bojan Velickovic: $14,000 (fight was declared a majority draw)

Damien Brown: $20,000 (includes $10,000 win bonus)
def. Cesar Arzamendia: $10,000

As always, the payouts do not include the Reebok Outfitting Policy Payouts, fight night bonuses as well as other undisclosed bonuses.

Payout Perspective:

The payouts do not include Ian McCall and his show and win bonus despite not fighting.  Notably, Jake Ellenberger made $75K/$75K plus an extra $50K for his stoppage of Matt Brown.  A nice $200K for a guy that was going to be out of a job in the UFC.

The fallout from Brock Lesnar’s potential drug violation

July 18, 2016

On Friday, Brock Lesnar was flagged by the United States Anti-Doping Association (USADA) of a potential violation of the UFC anti-doping policy due to an out of competition test from June 28, 2016.  Although testing results of Lesnar’s “B” sample are yet to be revealed, the fallout from Lesnar’s appearance hurts the UFC and possibly the WWE.

On June 5, 2016, it was announced that Lesnar would fight at UFC 200 on July 9, 2016.  The signing was unprecedented because he was under contract with the WWE.  Yet, the WWE granted Lesnar the chance to fight in the Octagon once again.  Despite the fact that the WWE has its own drug testing policy (known as the Wellness Policy – Lesnar has never been flagged for a violation), Lesnar was tested by USADA eight times in just the month lead-up to his fight against Mark Hunt.  He took 5 tests in the first two weeks after it was announced he was returning.  Multiple tests came up clean.

Despite the tests, the UFC policy handled by USADA dictated that a returning athlete to the UFC most give the company four months written notice so that USADA can put the athlete in the pool of those it may selectively test.  But, the UFC anti-doping policy allows an exemption for a returning athlete that may be subject to drug testing.  Per 5.7.1 of the UFC anti-doping policy:

An Athlete who gives notice of retirement to UFC, or has otherwise ceased to have a contractual relationship with UFC, may not resume competing in UFC Bouts until he/she has given UFC written notice of his/her intent to resume competing and has made him/herself available for Testing for a period of four months before returning to competition. UFC may grant an exemption to the four-month written notice rule in exceptional circumstances or where the strict application of that rule would be manifestly unfair to an Athlete.

The key sentence here is the last sentence:  “UFC may grant an exemption to the four-month written notice rule in exceptional circumstances or where the strict application of that rule would be manifestly unfair to an Athlete.”

Since the UFC Anti-Doping Policy did not begin until July 1, 2015 and Lesnar’s last fight in the UFC prior to UFC 200 was December 2011, he was considered a new athlete.  There has not been an official statement as to whether the UFC granted the 4-month exemption due to an “exceptional circumstance” or if it was “manifestly unfair to an Athlete.”  Of course, either waiver could be easily explained.

But, one has to think that Lesnar and the UFC had contemplated his return as he had been training prior to the June announcement of his return to the Octagon.  One might suggest that Lesnar could have notified the UFC of his return in the requisite 4 months to allow for the proper testing to occur.

However, it would seem that the parties wanted the Lesnar announcement to be a surprise.  Recall, that Ariel Helwani and others from MMA Fighting were thrown out of a UFC event and Helwani was banned for life due to his report of Lesnar’s return prior to the UFC’s opportunity to make it themselves.  Helwani along with his colleagues were reinstated a couple days later.

Notwithstanding the notice issue, let’s take a look at what Lesnar could face as a result of testing positive for a banned substance.  First, Lesnar’s “B” sample, a second sample taken to determine the validity of the finding in the first sample, must confirm the initial finding of a banned substance.  If this happens, Lesnar will face discipline from Nevada and the UFC per the anti-doping policy.

Since the infraction took place in Nevada, Lesnar will have to appear before the Nevada State Athletic Commission to address the drug test failure.  At that time, we should know what drug(s) Lesnar tested positive for in his out-of-competition sample.  In 2015, Nevada adopted guidelines for combat sports which included a 36-month suspension and 50-75% of the purse for a first-time offender for someone taking anabolic steroids.

In addition, the UFC anti-doping policy would discipline Lesnar.

Under Section 10 for Sanctions on Individuals, Section 10.1 specifically states:

An Anti-Doping Policy Violation occurring during, or in connection with, a Bout may, upon the decision of UFC, lead to Disqualification of all of the Athlete’s results obtained in that Bout with all Consequences, including, without limitation, forfeiture of title, ranking, purse or other compensation, except as provided in Article 10.1.1.

Read broadly, under the UFC-USADA Anti-Doping Guidelines, Lesnar could have his purse for the bout and “other compensation” taken from him.  It would hurt enough that Lesnar would lose out on his $2.5 million reported purse but “other compensation” could mean money he makes from his PPV “upside.”

Not only could that happen, but the section further states that UFC could fine Lesnar up to $500,000 per Section 10.10 of the UFC-USADA Anti-Doping Guidelines.  In addition, he could have his win against Mark Hunt overturned to a no decision per discretion of the Nevada State Athletic Commission according to section 467.850.  This would not sting as much since Lesnar did not have a win bonus to forfeit.  Regardless, he still could have a substantial amount of money taken away.

The monetary fine would be the hardest penalty for Lesnar.  The $2.5 million is the largest reported payout for a UFC fighter in its history.  But, Lesnar was going to make more from his PPV guarantee.  It is being reported that the UFC 200 PPV drew 1.1 to 1.2 million PPV buys.  In most markets, the PPV for UFC 200 was $59.99 HD and $49.99 SD.  Lesnar was projected to make $3-5 million in addition to his $2.5 million.

Mark Hunt, Lesnar’s opponent has demanded that he receive half of Lesnar’s $2.5 million or else he is requesting his release from his UFC contract.  Hunt, who made $700,000 for taking on Lesnar, will be disappointed to learn that under the UFC-USADA guidelines, any money forfeited by an athlete would be under the UFC’s discretion “to be applied to offset the costs of the Program or given to anti-doping research.”

The UFC could also fine Lesnar pursuant to its Code of Conduct which imposes discipline based on misconduct.  Under its Code, “misconduct” may include, “Conduct that undermines or puts at risk the integrity and reputation of the UFC.”  A violation of its drug program could fall under this.

There is precedent for a fine as Jon Jones was docked $25,000 for failing a drug test in December 2014.  Of course, Jones’ drug test failure was for cocaine use.  We note that the detection of this drug was done out of competition and should have not been tested for according to the rules.

Lesnar’s only statement related to Friday’s news of his potential violation was a vague “we’ll get to the bottom of this.”

The WWE does not seem to be concerned with the potential violation and has indicated his next appearance will be at its big event Summerslam, August 21st.  They have not addressed the potential violation.  From its perspective, its an MMA matter, that a WWE matter.

However, the question looms as to whether a Nevada State Athletic Commission suspension would affect his wrestling career.  Some state athletic commissions oversee professional wrestling.  Most commissions honor suspensions of an athlete in other states.  Would a suspension in combat sports carry over to professional wrestling?  We will see.

Hunt wants half of Lesnar’s payout or else

July 16, 2016

With the news that Brock Lesnar may be guilty of a drug test violation, Lesnar’s UFC 200 opponent is asking for half of Lesnar’s purse or be released from his UFC contract.

According to MMA Fighting, Hunt is asking UFC officials that he be given half of Lesnar’s reported $2.5 million purse or else he be released from the company.

Per the disclosed pay released by the Nevada State Athletic Commission, Hunt made $700,000 for facing Lesnar.  It was the highest disclosed amount Hunt has been paid by the company for a UFC fight.

Hunt had inferred that Lesnar may have been taking PEDs in lead-up to the fight.  But Lesnar denied it.

On Saturday, Lesnar responded to the USADA notification stating, “we will get to the bottom of this.”

Payout Perspective:

The ultimatum is interesting although I am not sure how much leverage has with this request.  Certainly Hunt has a legitimate issue with stepping in against an individual that may have taken PEDs.  Yet, if Hunt were to leave, there’s no other fight organization that would have the resources to pay Hunt the way he is compensated in the UFC.

UFC 200: Payout Perspective – Part 2 of 2

July 13, 2016

Welcome to UFC 200’s Part 2 of Payout Perspective.  We are once again recapping the weekend that was in the UFC.

UFC Sold to WME | IMG

The news came out on Sunday that Zuffa, LLC had sold the UFC to an investment group spearheaded by William Morris Endeavor and International Management Group.  As we learned the sale price was approximately $4 billion.

While Jeremy Botter’s report was met with denials as well as a lawyer letter, the news was true.  The Fertitta Brothers, Dana White and Flash Entertainment sold its shares in the UFC.

Prior to Sunday’s news, Los Angeles Times and TMZ both ran articles refuting the stories of a sale which were backed by Zuffa executives.  The TMZ story did not cite names but quotes from Zuffa execs while the Times ran a piece which included sit downs with White and Lorenzo Fertitta

More Promotion

UFC 200 introduced its main event of Jones vs. Cormier (after McGregor-Diaz was scrapped) on ABC’s Good Morning America.  The event included Dana White, Jon Jones, Daniel Cormier, Miesha Tate, Chuck Liddell and Frankie Edgar.  It was the second time that a fight was announced on GMA.  This time around, the UFC was front and center on the show.  It was good exposure for the company.  Too bad the main event didn’t stick.

Forbes ran a piece on the marketing behind those crazy graffiti posters.  Apparently part of the idea was based on Conor McGregor’s tirade at the pre-fight press conference at UFC 197.  McGregor was promoting his fight against Rafael dos Anjos.  Imagine if RDA did not get injured.

Bud Light offered limited edition UFC bottles.  Guess who promoted them:

Payouts

The complete list of salaries from UFC 200 as disclosed by the Nevada State Athletic Commission is as follows (via MMA Junkie):

Amanda Nunes: $100,000 (no win bonus)
def. Miesha Tate: $500,000

Brock Lesnar: $2,500,000 (no win bonus)
def. Mark Hunt: $700,000

Daniel Cormier: $500,000 (no win bonus)
def. Anderson Silva: $600,000

Jose Aldo: $500,000 (includes $100,000 win bonus)
def. Frankie Edgar: $190,000

Cain Velasquez: $300,000 (no win bonus)
def. Travis Browne: $120,000

Julianna Pena: $64,000 (includes $32,000 win bonus)
def. Cat Zingano: $35,000

Kelvin Gastelum: $86,000 (includes $33,000 win bonus and $20,000 from Hendricks’ purse)
def. Johny Hendricks: $80,000(Hendricks forfeited 20 percent of his original $100,000 show money to Gastelum for missing weight)

T.J. Dillashaw: $50,000 (includes $25,000 win bonus)
def. Raphael Assuncao: $42,000

Sage Northcutt: $100,000 (includes $50,000 win bonus)
def. Enrique Marin: $13,000

Joe Lauzon: $108,000 (includes $54,000 win bonus)
def. Diego Sanchez: $80,000

Gegard Mousasi: $110,000 (includes $35,000 win bonus)
def. Thiago “Marreta” Santos: $28,000

Jim Miller: $118,000 (includes $59,000 win bonus)
def. Takanori Gomi: $55,000

The Reebok Clothing payouts are here via MMA Junkie.  Notably, Aldo and Edgar both made $30,000 each as “challengers” since they were vying for the interim(?) Featherweight title.

Odds and Ends

What has happened to Johny Hendricks?

Early weigh-ins did not help Johny Hendrick as he yet again had issues with weight cutting.  Notably, Kelvin Gastelum has had problems in the past and just made the limit.  Miesha Tate had to disrobe to make the championship weight.

UFC 200 Prelims scored the highest rated show ever on FS2 as the first 31 minutes was switched to the network due to MLB going extra innings on FS1.  Despite the delay due to baseball, FS1 was the highest-rated prelim ever in the adult 28-49 demo.  The prelims on FS1 peaked with over 2 million viewers in the last quarter hour.

The last hour of the prelims went head-to-head with the first hour of PBC on ESPN.  PBC scored 442,000 viewers for its 2-hour plus event on Saturday night.

UFC offered the event in 4K.  It was the first time that a PPV was offered in 4K by any sport organization.

I missed Jon Jones’ press conference but I cannot say I feel sorry for him.  Whether or not he took PEDs, he’s been given chance after chance to succeed, but continues to fail.

Think about how much Jon Jones cost the UFC for them to tear down his posters and take his likeness off of the T-Mobile Arena.  There’s also the unsold t-shirts and posters.  He also cost UFC employees a night’s sleep to re-do all of the promotion centered around the Jones-Cormier main event.  Now that’s selfish.

International Fight Week

If you’ve never been to International Fight Week, it’s sort of like the NFL Experience at the Super Bowl.  If you have never been to that, think big convention hall with tons of sponsor/vendor booths, interactive areas and talks from special guests.  It’s a great thing to go and see if you’re a big UFC fan.  I realize that over the years this event may have lost steam, but once again, it’s something for the true UFC fan.

While UFC 200 and International Fight Week may have been much bigger with Ronda Rousey and/or Conor McGregor on the card, the event and week is a good opportunity for the UFC and its partners to engage with its fan base.

RDA, Alvarez top UFC Fight Night 90 salaries

July 11, 2016

MMA Junkie reports the salaries from Thursday’s UFC Fight Night 90.  Eddie Alvarez and Rafael dos Anjos topped the salaries on the roster Thursday.

The salaries were disclosed by the Nevada State Athletic Commission.

Via MMA Junkie:

Eddie Alvarez: $150,000 (no win bonus)
def. Rafael dos Anjos: $310,000

Derrick Lewis: $66,000 (includes $33,000 win bonus)
def. Roy Nelson: $100,000

Alan Jouban: $42,000 (includes $24,000 win bonus)
def. Belal Muhammad: $12,000

Joseph Duffy: $40,000 (includes $20,000 win bonus)
def. Mitch Clarke: $12,000

Alberto Mina: $24,000 (includes $12,000 win bonus)
def. Mike Pyle: $55,000

John Makdessi: $60,000 (includes $30,000 win bonus)
def. Mehdi Baghdad: $12,000

Anthony Birchak: $24,000 (includes $12,000 win bonus)
def. Dileno Lopes: $12,000

Pedro Munhoz: $34,000 (includes $17,000 win bonus)
def. Russell Doane: $11,000

Felipe Arantes: $42,000 (includes $21,000 win bonus)
def. Jerrod Sanders: $12,000

Gilbert Burns: $34,000 (includes $17,000 win bonus)
def. Lukasz Sajewski: $10,000

Marco Beltran: $24,000 (includes $12,000 win bonus)
def. Reginaldo Vieira: $17,000

Vicente Luque: $24,000 (includes $12,000 win bonus)
def. Alvaro Herrera: $12,000

Payout Perspective:

Alvarez received $150,000 with no win bonus.  The former champ, RDA, received $310,000.  Other notable salaries included Roy Nelson earning $100,000.  Derrick Lewis is slowly moving up the UFC salary scale making $33k/$33K.

Lesnar makes reported $2.5M, DC loses out on $1M payday

July 10, 2016

Brock Lesnar made a reported $2.5 million purse for UFC 200 according to Yahoo! Sports’ Kevin Iole.  It’s the biggest payout for a UFC fighter next to Conor McGregor.

Iole tweeted out the salaries for main card:

Here are the rest of the fighters on the PPV card minus Daniel Cormier which we discuss below:

Payout Perspective:

Certainly we’ll have the other payouts released by the commission later this week.  Lesnar probably made more than $2.5M since he should be receiving a PPV cut.  It’s notable that Cormier was to make $1 million for his Jones fight but made $500,000 against Silva.  More reason for DC to be mad at Jones.  DC may make up the money in his PPV upside but still would have made more against Jones.  Hunt likely makes the most of his career for stepping in against Brock.  Nunes will likely get champion pay and Tate will return to her regular pay scale.

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