NAC to vote on rehearing of McGregor disciplinary case

February 16, 2017

MMA Fighting reports that Conor McGregor requests a rehearing of his NAC disciplinary case.  In an unprecedented move, the NAC plans on putting McGregor’s request up for a vote at the March 22nd meeting.  Notably, NAC executive director and chairman Anthony Marnell recommend the request be granted.

According to a statement released by the NAC on Tuesday, McGregor met with Marnell and Bennett.

In October, the NAC determined McGregor’s original fine to be $75,000 plus 50 hours community service and a public service announcement that would be $75,000 in value.

Since then, McGregor has filed for a judicial review of the NAC ruling in Clark County Superior Court.

As we all know, McGregor is aiming for a boxing match with Floyd Mayweather.  With the intent that the matchup happens in Las Vegas, McGregor would have to obtain a license.  However, the disciplinary fine precludes McGregor from receiving the boxing license.

Payout Perspective:

A rehearing is a clear indication that the NAC wants to reduce the disciplinary charges for McGregor.  Moreover, they want to grant him a license so, if a fight with Mayweather actually occurs, it can happen in Vegas.  This rehearing is not how due process should occur as the appeal should go to the court.  But, if McGregor agrees to dismiss the judicial review in lieu of settling the case at the NAC, I’m sure that could happen.

Diaz assessed $50K fine and community service by NSAC

December 15, 2016

Nate Diaz has settled a complaint filed the Nevada State Athletic Commission for his role in the bottle-throwing incident at the UFC 202 pre-fight press conference.

Per ESPN’s Brett Okamoto:

NAC Diaz Answer by JASONCRUZ206 on Scribd

Diaz apologized for the incident in his Answer to the NSAC Complaint.  He did state that he “lightly tossed a half empty plastic water bottle in the direction of his opponent [McGregor] without the intent to strike anyone and, in fact, the bottle did not strike anyone.”   He had requested community service or suspension in lieu of monetary penalty.

Payout Perspective:

The settlement agreement does not include a suspension but a $50,000 fine which is similar to the amount given to Conor McGregor with the exception that McGregor must do a public service announcement.  The settlement saves Diaz from further legal issues related to the incident.

Commission to hear Lesnar, Jones and Diaz discipline cases

December 12, 2016

It appears that settlements have been brokered on behalf of 3 UFC fighters and the Nevada Athletic Commission.  MMA Fighting reports that the NAC announced Nate Diaz, Jon Jones and Brock Lesnar are scheduled to appear for hearing on their “proposed adjudication agreements” at the December 15th commission meeting in Las Vegas, Nevada.

Jones settled with the NAC on a one year suspension which would put him back in the Octagon by July 6, 2017 at the earliest.  He also was given a one year suspension by USADA.

Diaz hearing stems from his role in the UFC 202 pre-fight press conference.

NAC Diaz Complaint by JASONCRUZ206 on Scribd

NAC Diaz Answer by JASONCRUZ206 on Scribd

Lesnar’s complaint stems from two failed USADA drug tests after UFC 200.

NAC Lesnar Complaint by JASONCRUZ206 on Scribd

NAC Lesnar Answer by JASONCRUZ206 on Scribd

Payout Perspective:

Payout Perspective:

The anticipated settlements reflect the fact that no one wants to test the uncertainty of the punishment that the NAC may hand out.  Conor McGregor has filed a Petition for Review of his NAC fine of $75,000.  Depending on the length of the settlements, it likely means that the fighters will be able to plan their next fights.  In the case of Lesnar, it’s not clear whether he may fight in the UFC again.

Jon Jones settles with NAC

December 8, 2016

MMA Fighting reports that Jon Jones has reached a settlement with the Nevada State Athletic Commission and will serve a one year suspension.  Jones will be able to return this summer to the UFC octagon.

Jones avoids a hearing before the NAC which could have added on to a USADA suspension handed down to him in October.  A three-person arbitration panel handed down a one year suspension for Jones as he was the first UFC fighter to take USADA to arbitration.  The panel determined that Jones acted recklessly when he took a Cialis-like sexual enhancement pill without knowledge of its contents.  Jones had hoped that the arbitration panel would have been more lenient in its sentencing as a one year suspension was the original requested penalty for Jones.

Jones was to have appeared before the NAC next week at the commission’s monthly hearing.  Jones or his representatives will be there, but to confirm the agreed upon settlement, rather than deal with a punishment.

The one year suspension appears to be retroactive to the date of the discovery of his USADA drug test results, July 6, 2016.

Payout Perspective:

The settlement ensures that Jones will have a possibility to return to the UFC at about the same time that the UFC will run its annual International Fight Week.  This should/could mean the long awaited fight between Jones-Cormier could occur then assuming Jones stays out of trouble and Cormier remains injury-free.  With today’s news, Jones avoids the possibility of an additional suspension and/or prolonged legal battle.

NAC Jon Jones Complaint by JASONCRUZ206 on Scribd

NAC Jon Jones Answer by JASONCRUZ206 on Scribd

x

McGregor files Petition for Review of NSAC fine

December 8, 2016

Conor McGregor has filed a Petition for Judicial Review in Clark County, Nevada for his fine levied by the Nevada State Athletic Commission for his water-bottle throwing incident this past August.

Per MMA Junkie, McGregor filed the Petition for Judicial Review on November 18, 2016 per Clark County Court Records.  McGregor is represented by Jennifer Goldstein.  The Nevada State Athletic Commission is represented by Caroline Bateman.

The commission issued a $150,000 fine this past October.  The commission clarified that it was a $75,000 fine and he was to cut a public-service announcement in an amount valued at $75,000.

McGregor reportedly made $3 million from UFC 202 not counting undisclosed bonuses or PPV points.

The state attorney general originally recommended a $25,000 fine but the commission believed that was not sufficient.

Payout Perspective:

The appeal of a commission ruling results in filing a lawsuit in the superior court which is what McGregor has done.  You might recall that Wanderlei Silva filed a similar petition for review in 2015 related to his lifetime ban.  The state court ruled in Silva’s favor, but the order was to remand back to the commission.  Silva appealed to the state Supreme Court but that did not work out.  There is potential for McGregor’s commission penalty to be reversed but it will likely mean that the court will send it back to the commission for to re-determine the penalty.  MMA Payout will keep you posted.

Lundvall’s term on NSAC coming to end

October 23, 2016

MMA Fighting reports that Pat Lundvall’s appointment on the Nevada Athletic Commission will end at the end of October.  Lundvall has served for a total of 9 years for the commission.

Lundvall, an attorney in Nevada, has been in a central figure in some of the more recent discipline hearings before the commission.  Most recently, she was a factor in the discipline hearing involving Conor McGregor.  Instead of accepting a recommendation from the state attorney general of a $25,000 fine and community service, Lundvall motioned for a $150,000 penalty which included the value of a public service announcement (PSA)which McGregor was ordered to film.

After initial reports that the fine was for $150,000, it was clarified that the amount was $75,000 and the value of the PSA was $75,000.

Lundvall was also a central commissioner in the hearing of Nick Diaz in which he was assessed a 5 year ban which was eventually reduced.

Payout Perspective:

Lundvall’s departure will be met with a sigh of relief by some within the MMA community as some of the decisions spearheaded by Lundvall seemed punitive and without much rationale behind them.  The Diaz punishment comes to mind.  Even McGregor’s punishment seemed out of ordinary and it appeared that it was done to show the commission’s muscle rather than anything else.

Nevada clarifies Conor’s fine

October 17, 2016

MMA Fighting reports that Nevada’s Athletic Commission’s executive director Bob Bennett has clarified the fine assessed to Conor McGregor from his bottle-throwing incident.  He states that the fine is $75,000 and not the $150,000 as previously reported.

Despite the fact that the $150,000 number was indicated at an open hearing of the commission, Bennett clarified that the fine was $75,000 and the value of a public-service announcement McGregor must do for the commission is valued at $75,000.

McGregor reportedly made $3 million from UFC 202 not counting undisclosed bonuses or PPV points.

The state attorney general originally recommended a $25,000 fine, 25 hours of community service and media training.  The commissioners believed that amount was not enough.

McGregor was not a fan of the $150,000 fine stating that he would not fight in Nevada in the foreseeable future.

Payout Perspective:

The backtracking to clarify the fine and then blame media seems like a mishandling of the situation by the NSAC and a way to reduce the fine without drawing an appeal.  The $75,000 value seems like it was pulled out of the air without any evidence that a PSA would cost this much.

McGregor fined $150,000 by Nevada

October 10, 2016

ESPN reports that the Nevada State Athletic Commission has fined Conor McGregor $150,000 for his part of a water bottle-throwing incident at the pre-fight press conference leading up to UFC 202.

The commission decided to fine McGregor 5% of his fight purse and the funds will be disbursed between the state’s general fund and an anti-bullying campaign proposed by McGregor and his attorney at the hearing.  In addition to the fine, McGregor is to do PSAs to benefit children.  The Featherweight champion attended the hearing via phone.

The attorney general’s recommendation was to fine McGregor $25,000, community service and media training.  But that was not enough for the commission.  Their original proposal was to fine McGregor 10% of his fight purse, which would have amounted to $300,000.  However, the commission deemed it too hefty a fine.  Instead, it came to $150,000 plus the community service.

Payout Perspective:

The arrival of the punishment seemed to be something done on the fly and without much logical reasoning behind it.  While the AG recommendation seemed too low to them, they felt that they needed to exact more out of McGregor which was 6 times the recommended amount.  Certainly, they could have suspended McGregor from fighting in the state to send a message.  But, they realize that he’s set records in the state for attendance and gate in Nevada and that would be detrimental to the state.  Although McGregor can appeal the punishment by appealing in court, it seems unlikely.

Nevada Athletic Commission files complaints against Diaz, McGregor

September 21, 2016

MMA Junkie has obtained the NSAC complaints against Nate Diaz and Conor McGregor as it relates to the dustup between the two and Diaz’s camp at the UFC 203 pre-fight press conference.

As you may recall, the press conference ended abruptly after McGregor showed up late and Diaz left soon thereafter.  Verbal exchanges were made and water bottles were thrown.  The NSAC has filed complaints against the two.

The complaints, which mirror one another, cite NAC 467.885 which governs discipline for licensed fighters within the state.  It also cites NRS 467.158 which gives the commission the power to penalize a licensed fighter up to $250,000 for “disciplinary action [that] does not relate to a contest or exhibition of unarmed combat…”  Since this was a press conference, the commission would use this rule to govern the altercation.  It also cites NRS 467.110 which allows the commission to suspend or revoke the license of a fighter.

Payout Perspective:

Look for these two complaints to be settled and/or a stiff fine for both Diaz and McGregor.  Do not look for a suspension of any kind.  In reality, the commission will not want to suspend either fighter unless its known they will not fight in the state for the next 6 months or so.  While there is a need to penalize the two, it’s clear that the commission will not want to harm itself by suspending two of the top grossing fighters for the UFC.

Li Jingliang avoids USADA punishment after flagged test

September 2, 2016

UFC welterweight Li Jingliang will avoid punishment from USADA despite testing positive for trace amount of clenbuterol.  USADA determined that the prohibited substance was ingested without fault or negligence.

The flagged test occurred on May 18, 2016, prior to his fight at The Ultimate Fighter 23 Finale.  Jingliang defeated Anton Zafir in his bout.

Per the UFC-USADA Anti-doping web site: “Clenbuterol is an Anabolic Agent prohibited at all times under the UFC Anti-Doping Policy, which has adopted the World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA) Prohibited List.”  Tainted meat appears to be a possible culprit as it relates to the finding in tests.

According to USADA officials, after an investigation, it has concluded that the Clenbuterol finding is likely due to consuming contaminated meat in China.

Jingliang will not face a period of ineligibility for his positive test.

While the NSAC could feasible discipline Jingliang, I would surmise that based on this finding it is unlikely.

Next Page »