World Series of Fighting and PFL file appeal against former officers of WSOF

June 20, 2018

The World Series of Fighting litigation continues in Nevada.  Despite re-emerging earlier this month as the Professional Fighters’ League, the lawsuit(s) continue over the power struggle between individuals, entities and now with a new investment group, more litigants. In this instance, the lawsuit hinges on a licensing agreement which contained an arbitration provision.

The licensing agreement between the parties described below is related to a prior Settlement Agreement and Operating Agreement between the two sides.  As you might infer, this business divorce is a mess.

There has been a plethora of lawsuits filed by different people and entities and this one is the latest involving the inception of WSOF.  The lawsuit in question pits rival entities over the split up and sale of World Series of Fighting when it was sold to investors that repackaged it as the PFL.

In this lawsuit plaintiffs are WSOF Global and its head Vince Hesser and Zion Wood Obi Wan Trust (Zion) and Shawn Wright (collectively referred to as Plaintiffs).  The defendants include MMAWC, LLC doing business as World Series of Fighting, MMAX Investment Partners, Inc., doing business as PFL, Bruce Deifik, Carlos Silva, Nancy and Bruce Deifik Family Partnership and Keith Redmond, Inc.

The lawsuit claimed that MMAWC, LLC, which did business as WSOF experienced several financial shortfalls during 2012 to 2015.  The plaintiffs had made “extensive loans” to the promotion to allow the promotion to continue and operate.  But, WSOF refused to repay the loans.

Zion Wood Obi Wan Trust Complaint by JASONCRUZ206 on Scribd

Additionally, Shawn Wright and Vince Hesser had written agreements with WSOF for other contractual payments and worldwide licensing.  WSOF Global had acquired rights to the intellectual property of WSOF overseas and had invested in the brand under the assumption it was planning to expand.  But, WSOF refused to honor the terms of the agreement per the Complaint.  Zion’s membership interest was 10.5% and WSOF executed agreements that it was non-dilutable.

The dispute was thought to have been resolved after the organizations entered into a Settlement Agreement.  As part of the agreement, Zion agreed to reduce its 10.5% non-dilutable interest in WSOF to 4.50% of the total outstanding ownership units in WSOF, which interest shall remain non-dilutable.  But, Zion believed that Bruce Deifik created a new entity and put all of the WSOF assets into the PFL organization.

Zion did not have an interest in the “Successor Company,” PFL.  As a result, it believed that its shares were being diluted.

The Complaint stated WSOF sold the company for $15 million, but without input from Zion and WSOF Global, Inc., who held shares in the WSOF.  Additionally, Plaintiffs claimed it was being shut out from finding out the real value of the deal which would help them assess the purported amount that they would have been entitled.

The Complaint also mentioned a WSOF event in New York City on New Year’s Eve 2016.  The WSOF reported $0 income from broadcasting rights to New York State.  But, it reported to Zion that they spent $190,000 in broadcasting revenue from NBC to the NYC event.  This would be inconsistent reporting.

But, the big issue here is the licensing deal between Vince Hesser, the owner of WSOF Global, and WSOF.  An Amended Master License Agreement gave Mr. Hesser the exclusive right to license the WSOF brand outside the United States.  A dispute arose over the licensing agreement and was thought to have been subsequently settled.  WSOF Global claims to have rights that “consist of over 100 international events per year, at a cost to produce of tens of millions of dollars, which dwarf the mere 8-10 events per year” from WSOF.

But, when the WSOF sold to PFL, it failed to comply with the licensing agreement.  The obvious breach was the change of the name to the Professional Fighters League which plaintiffs claimed damage them.  The PFL did not grant WSOF Global the right to use the PFL name in the Settlement Agreement and Amended License Agreement.

Prior to the name change, WSOF Global claimed that it was working on a sports partnership to bring MMA content to China.  It claims it received $16 million to further the promotion of WSOF in China and to promote foreign fighters in their events alongside Chinese fighters.  This would appear to be part of the damages to be claimed in this lawsuit.

WSOF stated that the parties should be compelled to arbitration to resolve these disputes and pointed to the clause in the Amended Licensing Agreement.

The arbitration clause in the parties’ licensing agreement compels the Court to dismiss this case and force the parties to arbitration.  But, the plaintiffs contend that they did not specifically authorize the arbitration agreement.  Under the state law in Nevada, a party must grant “specific authorization” that they have agreed to their arbitration provision otherwise it is void.  Plaintiffs cite the lack of specific authorization in the contract to show that the arbitration provision was void.

In its reply to the opposition of moving the case to arbitration, WSOF argued that the parties jointly drafted and authorized the agreement which included the arbitration clause.  Thus, despite WSOF’s assertion that Plaintiffs had knowledge of the clause and the opportunity to point out the issue, it did not.  Moreover, it agreed to the overall agreement.

The Court found in favor of Plaintiffs’ arguments and voided the arbitration provision and denied WSOF’s motion to compel arbitration.  Shortly after the ruling, WSOF filed to appeal the decision.

In its appeal statement WSOF noted, “When the parties finalized the Arbitration provision, however, the parties did not include language and initials or separate signatures to further manifest their agreement to the Arbitration provision…”

WSOF Case Appeal Statement by JASONCRUZ206 on Scribd

Despite the fact that WSOF believed that the Arbitration provision should have been allowed, the Court found it void due to the lack of a “specific authorization.”

The appeal will be heard in the state appellate court in Nevada.  The lawsuit was filed in the District Court of Clark County, Nevada.

Payout Perspective:

While there is the possibility that the Plaintiffs in the lawsuit may amend its RICO claim, it was dismissed by the Court.  However, the case is not going to Arbitration due to the fact the Court voided the provision.  While WSOF may allege that having the parties sign a section consenting to Arbitration is duplicative if you consider they signed the Agreement.  Also, in this instance, the parties allegedly collaborated on putting together the Agreement.  Yet, the Nevada state rules are explicit that there must be a specific authorization which appears to be more than just signing the contract overall but making an affirmative concession to the clause.

As it goes for the overall transaction, it appears that Hesser and Wright are creditors to the WSOF entity and were not privy to the sale of assets to the successor company, PFL.  While there was a transaction to do business under the WSOF brand, there was not one to do under any successor brand.  It would seem that either poor business acumen, lack of communication or a bad business deal has transpired.  Maybe all of the above.

One thing is for certain, both sides have shown errors in contractual drafting.  Plaintiffs should have included clauses that would have protected itself form any sale of assets from the debtor (i.e., WSOF).  For WSOF, it should have drafted an Agreement in compliance with the Nevada state law that would ensure specific authorization for Arbitration.  While Arbitration may have been a faster, cost-efficient way to resolve a dispute, it looks like this case will be litigated.  But first, the appeal.

MMA Payout will keep you posted.

PFL kicks off season Thursday night with a lot on the line

June 6, 2018

The Professional Fighters League kicks off on Thursday on NBC Sports Network and Facebook Watch as it seeks to reinvent itself with a season-like year culminating in a bracket-style playoff and $10 million pool of prize money for the champions for each respective weight division.

The PFL will hold its “regular season” events this summer on Thursday nights.  In the fall, the events will switch to Saturday nights for the playoffs and will end with a New Year’s Eve event to crown the champions.  The winner of each division will win $1 million.

The deal with NBC Sports Network is a one-year revenue sharing deal.  Previously, the network aired World Series of Fighting events to modest ratings.  The Facebook deal will be an interesting watch since the PFL succeeded in its one event it aired last year on the platform.

The league will have a uniform policy, but it will allow room for fighters’ sponsors.  The move looks to be a way to appease fighters while capitalizing on negotiating its own sponsor deals.  Arguably, the move looks to build on lessons from the UFC’s Outfitting Policy.

The roster of fighters vying for the $1 million in each division is a mix of prospects, international fighters and former UFC fighters.

The company will draw upon shoulder programming to promote its fighters in hopes of creating personalities for viewers to latch on to similar to episodic television.

Putting the “regular season” on Thursday nights might be a good move considering WSOF was buried on Friday and Saturday nights and seemed to be going up against a Bellator or UFC card.  Thursdays during the summer may be a tactical gamble that may work out.  Moving the day of the show during its “playoffs” may be a risk since it will get bogged down with football.  But, the hope would be that the company would have reeled in a core base that would continue to follow the season.

PFL CEO, Peter Murray was interviewed on the Sports Business Radio Podcast to promote the new season.  Murray, formerly of Under Armour, spoke about meeting with the ownership group of the PFL who were enthused about the product.  He spoke about the ‘season’ and ‘championship’ aspect as what distinguished the PFL from other MMA leagues.  He talked about the distribution deals with NBC Sports Network and Facebook Watch.  He noted that Facebook Watch being a disrupter in the industry.

The success of this venture will depend heavily on the entertainment value of the fights and the overarching factor that no one gets hurt and has to withdraw from the tournament and/or a fighter misses weight and cannot compete.  The unknowns that can derail a fight or event are likely a big concern for the PFL.  Everything must go right this season for the PFL to have a second season.  You might infer that NBC Sports Network will remain a partner with the PFL so long as it drawing enough revenue (and ratings) to make it worthwhile.  Facebook Watch is a non-traditional medium which the PFL hopes to capitalize on by helping the platform bolster its content.  Still, the amount of views and how long people stay to watch will be something that execs will keep tabs on.

While the optimist sees potential for the PFL, the pessimist sees a lot of trappings of defunct leagues of the past.

Brian Stann joins PFL to lead Fighter and Competition/Rule Committee

May 17, 2018

The Professional Fighters’ League announced that Brian Stann has joined the  promotion on the Fighter Competition/Rules Committee.

Via PFL press release:

The Professional Fighters League (“PFL”) today announced that former MMA star and veteran Brian Stann will help lead the league’s 2018 Fighter and Competition/Rules Committee, bringing his expertise to the first “true sports format” MMA league. Stann will play a major leadership role on the Fighter and Competition/Rules Committee in its efforts to support fighters by developing procedures and making recommendations with respect to competition format and rules, fighter care, and athlete conduct. Under Stann’s leadership, the Committee will play an important role in the “fighters first” league as it debuts its 2018 regular season live on Thursday, June 7, at Hulu Theater at Madison Square Garden in New York City.

In 2017 Stann left his post as a commentator for UFC events to pursue a position as a COO at a real estate firm and also going to school to pursue his Masters in Business Administration.

Payout Perspective:

Stann’s addition brings a level of credibility to a promotion that desperately needs to have a great year for a multitude of reasons.  We will see how much of a role he has once the PFL events begin and whether he will remain on with the promotion.

PFL announces uniform policy for upcoming season

May 11, 2018

The Professional Fighters League has announced a uniform policy which will begin at the start with its first event this June.  Unlike the UFC’s uniform policy, it will allow up to 2 sponsors in designated areas of the uniform.

MMA Fighting first reported the news of the uniform policy. Sponsors will be allowed to be on warmups including hoodies and hats.

The PFL will supply the fighter with gloves and shorts.  PFL official apparel will be required for walk ins and weigh-ins.  The sponsors must be consistent on the shorts and walkout wear (i.e., hoodies and hat).  Fighters can change sponsors and logos three times throughout the season.

 

Of course, the PFL reserves the right to feature up to two logos of official league brand partners on the fight shorts and other gear.

 

The new policy eliminates banners in the cage and there is also a ban on certain sponsors such as vape, tobacco, condoms, porn and gambling.

 

Payout Perspective:

 

The uniform policy seems to be a compromise of sorts in which the PFL give the fighters an opportunity to solicit sponsors but also has the ability to sell its own sponsorships.  No clothing sponsor was announced although I would think that Under Armour might be in the running since some of the investors are tied to the company.  The most notable thing in the policy is the ban on certain sponsors including vape and gambling companies which would seemingly be big sponsors at this time.  Yet, the policy is a move to create a brand for the promotion.  This seems to be important, especially for this promotion at this time as it starts this new venture.

PFL finds new TV deal with familiar partner

January 29, 2018

The Professional Fighter’s League is back with NBC Sports Network as part of a one year revenue sharing deal according to John Ourand of the Sports Business Journal.

Previously the World Series of Fighting, the organization went through a regime change and renamed itself the PFL.  This year it will offer a league setup with the promise that fighters on its roster will get regular fights and offer a league-style makeup for its six weight divisions culminating with a $10 million prize for fighters at the end of the year.

The article indicates that Jon Miller, NBC Sports Networks’ head of programming reached out to the new PFL heads as he has previously worked with PFL Executive Chairman Russ Ramsey and PFL President of Event Production Carlos Silva. Miller was also fond of CEO Peter Murray, who Miller worked with at the NFL and Under Armour.

In addition to NBC Sports network, Facebook has agreed to pick up the streaming rights for the PFL which include events that are not carried by NBCSN and will carry the first three hours of a PFL event before NBCSN takes over.

Payout Perspective:

The deal appears to be better than the previous WSOF “time buys” in which the organization purchased time from NBCSN.  Although no financial terms were not disclosed, it would seem that revenue sharing would mean that at least a portion of the advertising dollars and sponsorships from the televised event would go back to the network.  This may give a little more incentive for NBCSN to promote PFL.  The online streaming proved to be successful with the organization’s fans with PFL’s one event last year.  We still don’t have a solid date for the PFL to start but with this news, we should expect it happening sooner than later.

Former fighter threatens to sue PFL

December 20, 2017

MMA Fighting reports that former Professional Fighter’s League fighter Bruce Boyington is threatening legal action after he was informed by the PFL that he would not be included in the company’s 12-man lightweight division 2018 season.

Boyington is 14-11 and has lost his last 3 fights.  He claims to have had a four-fight contract with the predecessor entity, World Series of Fighting.  But, he’s being released having just fought one fight in the WSOF.  He believes that he was going to be a part of the PFL and turned down other fights and opportunities as he was waiting for the upcoming 2018 season.

This past year, the World Series of Fighting was purchased by new investors and promised a new format which would ensure that fighters would fight and be paid a salary.

Boyington took to social media to advocate his case against PFL.

In response, Ray Sefo addressed the issue:

Payout Perspective: 

There are two sides to every story.  Does Boyington have a case?  We are not sure because you’d have to look at his contract with the company.  One would think that he was classified as an independent contractor and as a result it’s likely he could be released from his contract at any time. Boyington notes that he relied upon the contract and turned down other offers to fight to stick with the PFL (these are his damages he’d claim in a lawsuit). But, Sefo seems to state that even if there was some duty to give a reason for his contract to be terminated, losing 3 in a row would be a valid one.  The underlying issue of the state of the PFL is compelling since the reboot of the company was to provide a fresh start and offer fighters an opportunity with fights and steady pay.  We will see if PFL can come through in 2018.

PFL draws 238K unique viewers for last Thursday’s online event

November 9, 2017

The Professional Fighters League announced it drew its largest online audience ever for its card last Thursday.  The online streams provided 238,000 unique views.

The four-bout card was on a Thursday and went up against NFL Thursday night football, NBA and NHL on television.  The event was headlined by Blagoy Ivanov vs. Caio Alencar.  It was a special Fight Night in Washington, DC as part of a “Fight for Children” event helping underserved youth.

Payout Perspective:

The viewership is impressive as a Thursday night MMA event is rare and it seemed overshadowed by the UFC 217 lead-up.  Still, the 238,000 unique viewers is better than the television viewership from its last NBC Sports Network show which drew just 153,000 viewers.  We’ll see if this means PFL will consider more shows online.

PFL: Everett draws 153,000 viewers on NBC Sports Network

August 4, 2017

The Professional Fighters League put on its second event in Everett, Washington on Saturday night.  The main card which aired on NBC Sports Network drew 153,000 viewers per Nielsen.

The event featured undefeated Andre Harrison as he soundly defeated Stephen Rodriguez in the main event.  The telecast also featured Jake Shields and Yushin Okami.  Both UFC vets handled their opponents soundly.

The event included a 20-minute overrun and drew 0.59 in the A18-49 demo and .87 in the M18-49 demo.

Payout Perspective:

The first PFL event in early July drew 291,000 viewers.  The event took place on a Friday and not a Saturday.  This past weekend’s event took place on a busy night for combat sports as UFC 214’s Prelims and PPV aired on the same night as did Broner-Garcia.

UFC 214: Payout Perspective

August 1, 2017

Welcome to another edition of Payout Perspective.  This time we take you to the Honda Center in Anaheim, California for UFC 214.

Jones returns to win back the UFC Light Heavyweight Title

The matchup finally happened and DC looked much better than their initial fight.  However, a headkick in the third round undid any momentum Cormier might have had as it was beginning of the end.  Maybe the fight was stopped too late as Jones reigned punches and elbows on a hurt Cormier.

Jones gave one of the best post-fight interviews in the Octagon as he praised Cormier and aspired to be more like him.  Whether or not you believed him is up to you but for his sake hopefully Jones can keep on the straight and narrow.

Should Cormier have been allowed to leave the Octagon as it was clear he was still not aware of what happened?  Should Joe Rogan have interviewed him after?  There was a lot made about Cormier crying after the fight but it’s clear that he had waited so long for this fight and wanted to beat Jones dearly.  The game plan was working out but one headkick spelled the doom.  You have to feel for him and it’s clear, similar to Ronda Rousey after the Holly Holm fight, that they should have left DC alone.  The footage of DC wandering around after being KO’d is hard to watch and you have to wonder why his corner was not able to corral him and sit him down.

The big news going forward after this is that Jones called out Brock Lesnar.  Lesnar is retired and still must serve out his USADA suspension.  News that he had put his name in the active testing pool were not true.  So, if this fight were to happen the earliest we might see this is July 2018.  In the meantime, it would be nice to see a rematch with Alexander Gustafsson.

Woodley wins but loses

Tyrone Woodley pitched a shutout with Demian Maia as he stuffed each of the 26 takedown attempts of the BJJ specialist which negated Maia’s path to victory.  The only problem with this is that Woodley did not supply much offense.  While Woodley displayed one of the best defensive fights in recent memory, the name of the game is excitement.  Even though Woodley announced he would fight GSP at MSG in November post-fight, Dana White had other thoughts.  Due to his performance, White announced GSP-Bisping for that date further distancing the relationship between Woodley and the UFC.

Cyborg wins her title

Let’s face it this division was meant for Cyborg Justino.  When a Megan Anderson fight was nixed and Tonya Evinger was her replacement, it gave fans all the more reason to think Justino would take this title.  Evinger did her best but could not match Cyborg here.  Despite Germain de Randamie winning the title against Holly Holm, Joe Rogan and Dominick Cruz threw shade at GDR for not wanting to face Cyborg.  The only fight you would think happens in this division is a fight with Holly Holm.

Attendance and gate

It was a new record for MMA events at the Honda Center with 16,610 fans for a live gate of $2,448,870.00.  With a variety of great UFC events held at the venue, including UFC on Fox 1, this event did the best of all of them.

Bonuses

The bonuses went to Jones, Vokan Oezdemir, Brian Ortega and Renato Moicano.  Ortega and Moicano earned the Fight of the Night as Ortego submitted Moicano in the 3rd round with a back and forth fight.  Oezdemir vaulted into the Light Heavyweight title picture with a KO of former contender Jimi Manuwa and Jones won with his stoppage of DC.

The Curran-Albu fight could have earned a FOTN but the Ortega sub probably was the deciding factor.  Ricardo Lamas also had a potential Performance Bonus based on his stoppage of Jason Knight.

Payouts

Daniel Cormier earned $1 million and Jon Jones drew $500,000 for the main event.  A total of 11 fighters made a reported 6 figures for UFC 214.  In comparison (and perhaps unfair), the total reported salaries from PFL Everett was $376,5000.  3 fighters made more than that at UFC 214.

Tyrone Woodley made $500,000 for his title defense against Damian Maia.

Promotion of the Fight

The Summer Kickoff press conference a couple months ago kicked off the run up for this event.  Obviously, everyone held their breath that this fight would happen considering the past problems with booking the rematch.

The UFC put on some great video promos for UFC 214 featuring Jones and Cormier.

Notably, the Embedded series focused a lot on Cyborg and less on the Woodley-Maia co-main.  Whether it was logistics since Cyborg trains in Southern California or a choice to push Cyborg more than Woodley.  Also, no Cerrone antics on the Embedded which was disappointing.

Sponsorships

The sponsors in the Octagon at UFC 214 with Toyo Tires, MetroPCS, Budweiser, Harley Davidson, Monster Energy, UFC Mobile, Dana White’s Contender Series on Fight Pass, Gruntsyle.com, Performance Nutrition and 7-11.  Monster Energy had the center of the Octagon.  The UFC Mobile game was also featured in the Octagon.

HSS was a new sponsor on the telecasts as it sponsored the fight clock.

Performance Nutrition sponsored the Embedded episodes this time around.

Also, 7-Eleven, which has shared signage with Monster Energy in one of the Octagon posts.  It also sported the Big Gulp logo during the broadcasts as well as voiceovers about the convenience store.

Tyron Woodley, Jon Jones and Donald Cerrone were some of the fighters sponsored by Monster Energy.

Metro PCS used Facebook Live and Periscope to promote UFC 214 during the event.

Interesting to note that while they did show Mayweather-McGregor insets during the telecasts, there was nothing on the mat or Octagon promoting the fight.

Odds and ends

Before we talk UFC 214, I went to PFL Everett, Washington Saturday night.  On Friday afternoon, I interviewed Carlos Silva and Ray Sefo.  During the Yushin Okami fight, I heard a heckler yell out to Okami, “Remember Pearl Harbor,” which is in reference to Okami being Japanese and that’s really about it because it made no real sense except the guy was a racist.  He followed up with “Come on, we were all thinking it.”  Actually, no I’m sure a lot of people were not thinking racist thoughts because you see a Japanese guy.  There were some murmurs and snickers from people around me which is disturbing as well.  Unfortunately, it goes to show you that racism still persists and people are not afraid to express it.

The Prelims aired on FXX and despite the fact that it aired on a channel different than its usual spot, I suspect that these fights will do well ratings-wise.  No problems with finding the channel as it drew 866,000 viewers and peaked over 1 million during the Sterling-Barao fight.

It’s always awkward to see fighters from other organizations cornering their teammates.  Notably at UFC 214 we saw Tito Ortiz in Cyborg’s corner and Ben Askren with Tyrone Woodley.

CSAC prevented Renan Barao from cutting down to 135 pounds and his fight with Aljamain Sterling was at a catchweight of 140.  Despite a request, Sterling was not given more money for accepting the catchweight fight.

Also of note Sterling and Al Iaquinta are getting into the real estate business.  I feel a reality show on UFC Fight Pass upcoming.

Three interesting notes in MMA journalism at UFC 214.  First, the MMAJA had its first meeting.  The second was Luke Thomas was shut down by Jon Jones after asking a question.  While the question is subject to scrutiny, Jones’ utter refusal and the subsequent applause by fans goes against what a lot of MMA fans want, which is for journalists to ask questions and fighters to answer.  Granted, the question was probably not going to reveal anything as Jones is media trained but he still should have answered it.

Joe Rogan came under scrutiny as he decided to interview Daniel Cormier after it was clear he displayed the symptoms of someone that suffered a concussion.  Rogan stated that he wanted to give Cormier a chance to talk which is fair.  Yet, it seemed like the production crew that saw the footage of Cormier and/or DC’s corner could have prevented Rogan from making this decision.  Cormier did not say anything out of order but he could have which would have been awkward for live PPV.  Rogan apologized the next day via social media.  Some didn’t think the apology was enough but it does come into question the health of a fighter versus entertainment.  Certainly, fighters should not be interviewed after a head injury.  But, that is balanced with wanting to hear the raw emotions of the fight.  Rogan knew he probably shouldn’t interview Cormier (recall the Alistair Overeem interview after he lost to Stipe Miocic post-fight where Overeem thought Miocic tapped), but this was a big moment and the end of a heated, personal rivalry.  From the entertainment perspective, fans wanted closure and hear both sides of the story.

The three-man booth of Anik, Cruz and Rogan is still going through growing pains with Cruz and Rogan stepping over each other at times.

There were stars at the fights but forget all of them.  The Rock was in the building

Quotes of the night:

“Jarred Brooks can cuss ladies and gentlemen.”  – Jon Anik after Brooks’ post-fight interview

‘“I don’t know what’s happening in my hands, but that’s dynamite.”  Vokan Oezdemir after ending Jimi Manawa in less than 1 minute in R1.

There were over 2 million google searches for UFC 214 Saturday night.

Conclusion

This event seemed less-hyped than UFC 182 which was sold solely on Cormier-Jones.  Yet, the depth of this card would seem to help with the UFC casual fan.  The return of Jon Jones probably helped with last-minute buys as folks probably wanted to make sure that he would be fighting.  Will it surpass 1 million buys?  With over 2 million google searches it’s a possibility.  But, I think this event lands somewhere around UFC 182 and expect that it does the best for 2017 with 800,000 buys.

PFL Everett: Shields tops salaries; slightly over 3K in attendance

July 31, 2017

MMA Payout has obtained the attendance, gate and payouts from PFL Everett held in Everett, Washington on Saturday night.  Jake Shields led the roster of salaries with $100,000.

Shields soundly defeated Danny Davis, Jr. and earned $50,000 to show and a $50,000 win bonus.  UFC veteran Yushin Okami earned $50,000 total ($25,000 plus $25,000 win) for his win on the show.

According to the Washington State Department of Licensing, there were 489 paid tickets with 2,542 comps.  The total attendance was 3,031 with a gross gate revenue of $19,444.  The PFL held a promotion where U.S. veterans were given free entrance which might account for the number of comps.

Per the Washington State Department of Licensing the rest of the purses are as follows:

Punahele Soriano $1,000 ($1,000 win bonus) = $2,000 def Jon Gover $1,000 to show

Miles Hunsinger $3,000 ($3,000 win bonus) = $6,000 def Andy Nigretto $1,000

Jared Torgeson $2,000 ($2,000 win bonus) = $4,000 def Dale Sopi $3,000

Louis Taylor $8,000 ($8,000 win bonus) = $16,000 def Zach Conn $4,500

Luiz Firmino Carvalho $17,000 ($17,000 win bonus) = $34,000 def Eddy Ellis $5,000

Jared Rosholt $16,000 ($16,000 win bonus) =$32,000 def Nick Rossborough $6,000

Josh Copeland $10,000 ($10,000 win bonus) = $20,000 def Mike Kyle $15,000

Bruno Santos $8,000 ($8,000 win bonus ) = $16,000 def Rex Harris $7,000

Jake Shields $50,000 ($50,00 win bonus) = $100,000 def Danny Davis, Jr. $10,000

Yushin Okami $25,000 ($25,000 win bonus) = $50,000 def Andre Lobato $5,000

Andre Harrison $17,000 ($17,000 win bonus) = $34,000 def Steven Rodriguez $5,000

Payout Perspective:

The total reported salaries for PFL Everett came to $376,500.  Harrison, the main event earned as much as Carvalho, who was on the prelim show.  Shields and Okami, as expected earned the most.  The gate was more than I expected although I thought there were more paid attendance.  But with the veteram promotion and UFC 214 the same night (even though you could have gotten home to watch the co and main events) the number of paid attending seems very low.

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