Branch, Aguilar top WSOF 10 payouts

June 23, 2014

MMA Junkie reports the payouts from the World Series of Fighting 10 which took place in Las Vegas, Nevada.  David Branch and Jessica Aguilar ended up the top earners on Saturday night.

The $231,000 payroll was disclosed by the Nevada State Athletic Commission.

Via MMA Junkie:

David Branch: $36,000 (includes $18,000 win bonus)
def. Jesse Taylor: $9,000

Rick Glenn: $14,000 (includes $7,000 win bonus)
def. Georgi Karakhanyan: $20,000

Jessica Aguilar: $35,000 (includes $17,500 win bonus)
def. Emi Fujino: $6,000

Luiz Firmino: $14,000 (includes $7,000 win bonus)
def. Tyson Griffin: $8,000

Lance Palmer: $30,000 (includes $15,000 win bonus)
def. Nick LoBosco: $4,000

Derrick Mehmen: $14,000 (includes $7,000 win bonus)
def. Dave Huckaba: $8,000

Timur Valiev: $10,000 (includes $5,000 win bonus)
def. Adam Acquaviva: $1,000

Krasimir Mladenov: $4,000 (includes $2,000 win bonus)
def. Angel DeAnda: $4,000

Ashlee Evans-Smith: $6,200 (includes $3,000 win bonus)*
def. Marciea Allen: $800 (penalized for not making weight)

Jimmy Spicuzza: $3,000 (includes $1,500 win bonus)
def. Justin Jaynes: $1,000

A.J. Williams: $2,000 (includes $1,000 win bonus)
def. Tanner Cowan: $1,000

Payout Perspective:

Modest payouts for WSOF fighters but that is standard at this point for the company.  Allen was docked for not making weight and thus made only $800 instead of her scheduled $1,000.  Branch was the highest paid on the card thanks to an $18K/$18K payday.  Aguilar was second highest as she was at $17.5K/$17.5K.  Hard times for Tyson Griffin as he made $25,500 in a loss at UFC 137 (and he gave up 20% of his purse for not making weight) and now made only $8,000 in a losing effort.

Lawler, Cormier top UFC 173 salaries

May 27, 2014

MMA Junkie reports the salaries for Saturday’s UFC 173.  The total disclosed payroll for the event was $1,024,000 per the release by the Nevada State Athletic Commission.

Via MMA Junkie:

T.J. Dillashaw: $36,000 (includes $18,000 win bonus)
def. Renan Barao: $74,000

Daniel Cormier: $170,000 (includes $85,000 win bonus)
def. Dan Henderson: $100,000

Robbie Lawler: $200,000 (includes $100,000 win bonus)
def. Jake Ellenberger: $68,000

Takeya Mizugaki: $58,000 (includes $29,000 win bonus)
def. Francisco Rivera: $15,000

James Krause: $20,000 (includes $10,000 win bonus)
def. Jamie Varner: $17,000

Michael Chiesa: $40,000 (includes $20,000 win bonus)
def. Francisco Trinaldo: $12,000

Tony Ferguson: $40,000 (includes $20,000 win bonus)
def. Katsunori Kikuno: $10,000

Chris Holdsworth: $30,000 (includes $15,000 win bonus)
def. Chico Camus: $12,000

Mitch Clarke: $20,000 (includes $10,000 win bonus)
def. Al Iaquinta: $14,000

Vinc Pichel: $16,000 (includes $8,000 win bonus)
def. Anthony Njokuani: $20,000

Sam Sicilia: $20,000 (includes $10,000 win bonus)
def. Aaron Phillips: $8,000

Jingliang Li: $16,000 (includes $8,000 win bonus)
def. David Michaud: $8,000

Payout Perspective:

Robbie Lawler was the top earner of the night based on the reported payouts with $100,000 base and another $100,000 win bonus.  TJ Dillashaw earned a total of $136,000 with his two bonuses plus his $18,000 and $18,000 reported salary.  Previously, Dillashaw made $14K and $14K.  Daniel Cormier was also a big earner with $170,000 ($85K/$85K) for his work on Saturday.  Hendo also pulled in $100,000 with his loss.

Brown tops UFC Fight Night 40 salaries

May 12, 2014

MMA Junkie reports the salaries from UFC Fight Night 40 this past Saturday.  Main eventer Matt Brown topped the modest salary payroll of $680,000.

Via MMA Junkie:

Matt Brown: $82,000 (includes $41,000 win bonus)
def. Erick Silva: $22,000

Constantinos Philippou: $46,000 (includes $23,000 win bonus)
def. Lorenz Larkin: $28,000

Daron Cruickshank: $24,000 (includes $12,000 win bonus)
def. Erik Koch: $18,000

Neil Magny: $20,000 (includes $10,000 win bonus)
def. Tim Means: $10,000

Soa Palelei: $32,000 (includes $16,000 win bonus)
def. Ruan Potts: $10,000

Chris Cariaso: $42,000 (includes $21,000 win bonus)
def. Louis Smolka: $10,000

Ed Herman: $80,000 (includes $40,000 win bonus)
def. Rafael Natal: $26,000

Kyoji Horiguchi: $20,000 (includes $10,000 win bonus)
def. Darrell Montague: $8,000

Zak Cummings: $16,000 (includes $8,000 win bonus)
def. Yan Cabral: $10,000

Johnny Eduardo: $16,000 (includes $8,000 win bonus)
def. Eddie Wineland: $21,000

Nik Lentz: $58,000 (includes $29,000 win bonus)
def. Manny Gamburyan: $25,000

Justin Salas: $24,000 (includes $12,000 win bonus)
def. Ben Wall: $8,000

Albert Tumenov: $16,000 (includes $8,000 win bonus)
def. Anthony Lapsley: $8,000

Payout Perspective:

Brown had a great night as he made a reported total of $182,000 including the $100,000 in bonuses.  Ed Herman also did well with $80K total  Johnny Eduardo received a $50K bonus in addition to his $16K but was suspended 30 days for throwing his mouthpiece into the crowd in what has to be a UFC first.

UFC on Fox 11 salaries: Werdum on top

April 23, 2014

MMA Junkie reports the salaries from this past Saturday’s UFC on Fox 11 from Orlando, Florida.  The disclosed payroll released by the Florida State Boxing Commission was $974,000.

Via MMA Junkie:

Fabricio Werdum: $175,000 (includes $50,000 win bonus)
def. Travis Browne: $50,000

Miesha Tate: $56,000 (includes $28,000 win bonus)
def. Liz Carmouche: $17,000

Donald Cerrone: $114,000 (includes $57,000 win bonus)
def. Edson Barboza: $29,000

Yoel Romero: $50,000 (includes $25,000 win bonus)
def. Brad Tavares: $19,000

Khabib Nurmagomedov: $64,000 (includes $32,000 win bonus)
def. Rafael dos Anjos: $21,000

Thiago Alves: $78,000 (includes $39,000 win bonus)
def. Seth Baczynski: $20,000

Jorge Masvidal: $78,000 (includes $39,000 win bonus)
def. Pat Healy: $25,000

Alex White: $16,000 (includes $8,000 win bonus)
def. Estevan Payan: $10,000

Caio Magalhaes: $24,000 (includes $12,000 win bonus)
def. Luke Zachrich: $8,000

Jordan Mein: $36,000 (includes $18,000 win bonus)
def. Hernani Perpetuo: $8,000

Dustin Ortiz: $20,000 (includes $10,000 win bonus)
def. Ray Borg : $8,000

Mirsad Bektic: $16,000 (includes $8,000 win bonus)
def. Chas Skelly: $8,000

Derrick Lewis: $16,000 (includes $8,000 win bonus)
def. Jack May: $8,000

Payout Perspective:

Werdum’s last official reported salary was in February 2012 at UFC 143 when he earned a win over Roy Nelson and was paid $100,000 with no win bonus.  Since then Werdum has received a $25,000 raise and a $50,000 win bonus.  His opponent, Travis Browne received a nice raise as well.  At UFC 168, he earned $28K/$28K for his win against Josh Barnett.  Browne received $50,000 to show and presumably may have received another $50,000 for the win.  No raise for Miesha Tate as she earned the same pay rate $28K/$28K for UFC 168.

Pacquiao-Bradley II Payout Perspective

April 16, 2014

Welcome to a special edition of Payout Perspective.  This time we take a look at Pacquiao-Bradley II taking place at the MGM Grand Garden Arena.

Pacquiao ousts Bradley

It was even until the middle rounds when Timothy Bradley began to fade and Manny Pacquiao poured it on.  Bradley showboated a little and tried to feign he was not hurt by Pacquiao’s punches.  Either he was going to be a genius or he was trying to lose. Even when Bradley invited Pacquiao into skirmishes and attempted to emulate the same strategy as Juan Manuel Marquez with his KO in December 2012, Pacquiao seemed to win them and/or evade the big shot.

Pacquiao now faces the winner of Juan Manuel Marquez-Mike Alvarado on May 17th.  Most fans would probably like to see Pacquiao-JMM 5 because of the built-in storylines.  Their last battle drew 1.15 million PPV buys and would likely equal or eclipse that number.

Even though Pacquiao should face the JMM-Alvarado winner, the LA Times is reporting that the Pacquiao camp is lobbying for a shot at Mayweather.  Will this happen?  Don’t hold your breath.  However, the bargaining leverage is all with Mayweather.  Its Pacquiao with the reported money problems and he has been the one to concede the stricter drug testing and is willing to listen to a less than 50% split of a fight.  So, does that put pressure on Mayweather, or is this paragraph wasted time?  We have two different promotions and if you are Mayweather, only public perception would lead you to a fight with Pacquiao.  Does Mayweather really care about the public?

Attendance

Top Rank reported a sell out for the MGM Grand Garden Arena with 15,601 in attendance.  The weigh-ins a day earlier were at capacity as well with approximately 4,500 witnessing Pacquiao and Bradley weigh in and flex for those in attendance.

On Tuesday, the Nevada State Athletic Commission announced 14,099 tickets were sold for a total gate of $7.9 million.  H/t: Steve Kim


The gate was approximately $7,865,100 which is the lowest in years for Pacquiao.  The gate falls 24th on the list of top boxing gates for Nevada.  Pacquiao-Hatton in 2009 received an $8.8 million gate (15,368 in attendance) comes right before Pacquiao-Bradley II.

Payouts

It was reported that Manny Pacquiao and Timothy Bradley would earn $6 million each.  However, Bob Arum indicated that Pacquiao would make no less than $20 million.  Both would receive PPV upside as well.

The undercard payouts are as follows via Bad Left Hook:

Ray Beltran ($85,000) vs Arash Usmanee ($80,000)

Khabib Allakhverdiev ($250,000) vs Jessie Vargas ($90,000)

and Bryan Vasquez ($55,000) vs Jose Felix Jr ($40,000)

Promotion of the Fight

As is custom with a big fight, Pacquiao made an appearance on the Jimmy Kimmel Show.  Bradley made an appearance on the NBA on TNT in which he was interviewed during a Laker game.

Top Rank Boxing also utilized its web site to hype the fight as well as livestream the weigh-ins.

The customary repeats of Bradley and Pacquiao’s greatest fights including their first encounter were shown on HBO and on the Audience network.

It’s notable that less showings of HBO’s 24/7 series occurred over the multiple networks owned by Time Warner.  You may recall in past fights that the series could be seen on TNT, TBS and even CNN.  This time around, there was little cross-pollination.

HBO added a special on-location, live pre-fight show the Thursday before the fight in addition to its usual 24/7 shows.

One thing that drew the ire of Bob Arum was the fact that the MGM Grand had signs for Floyd Mayweather’s May 3rd fight.  The signs were more prominent than those of Pacquiao-Bradley II which was pointed out by Arum whenever he could.  Indirectly, this likely upset sponsor Tecate, since Mayweather fights are sponsored by Corona.  There’s obvious brand confusion ther.  Mayweather has fought at the MGM 9 straight times and it appeared that the loyalty took precedence over the Pacquiao-Bradley rematch.  It may also be due to the fact that Mayweather’s promotion has a contractual agreement to hype the fight at the MGM a certain time before the fight which may be the reason.

Sponsorships

The sponsors for this event include Tecate, Smart Communications, the leading wireless services provider for the Philippines

Tecate had its usual PPV rebate offer for those purchasing its beer at selected retailers.

The newest and most visible sponsor was Sony with its PlayStation 4 platform receiving high visibility during the fight including trailers of the PS4 gaming experience.  An example of this activation had PS4 running trailers in between fighter weigh-ins during the live stream on Top Rank’s web site.

Bradley wore a variety of hats to promote certain sponsors.  During his NBA on TNT interview, he wore a SaxonyInvest.com hat.  During the 24/7 series, he wore a Pocial hat which is a social networking web site that connects people through polls.  I am not sure if this is a great way to brand yourself but certainly Bradley is getting paid for these advertisements.

Bradley is still sponsored by Nike and had custom “Desert Storm” gear for the fight.  He also was sponsored by Lexani – a high end car wheel manufacturer. The shirt was on display at the weigh-ins.

Juan Diaz sported a Body Armor hat in the corner of Bradley during the fight.

Pacquiao’s cornermen must have received Mitshubishis as the Cerritos, California and South Coast Dealerships were plainly visible as patches on Buboy and others in Pacquiao’s corner.

Odds and Ends

An interesting takeaway from the 24/7 series is that Timothy’s wife, Monica Bradley, has taken over as his manager.  According to the show, she brokered Bradley’s new deal with Top Rank including the financial terms for this fight.  Bradley earned $6 million for his second fight with Pacquiao which is $1 million more than he earned in the first fight.  It’s a big question as to whether or not it’s a good idea to have your spouse represent you.  Negotiations can get heated and while it’s easier to grasp what your client wants, there may be an issue as to if you can separate yourself from the personal relationship.

Some may have noticed that Freddie Roach wore an Under Armour shirt at weigh-ins.  It seemed a bit odd considering that Pacquiao is sponsored by Nike and has worn Pacquiao Nike gear in the past.

The LA Times had an interesting article on the enforcement of PPV fees on bars that intend to show fights.  The charge is dependent on the size of the bar and the more seats in a bar, the more the bar has to pay.  As an example, a 50 seat bar is charged $1,600 for showing the PPV, a 51-100 seat bar is charged $2,200.  For those bars that may attempt to evade the fees, promoters employ enforcement that sues bars showing the PPV without paying.  Zuffa employs similar enforcement to protect itself from piracy.

With this fight, it’s likely that Pacquiao solidifies his spot as PPV royalty as he moves closer to the second spot of all-time top PPV performers.  Oscar de la Hoya currently owns second while Floyd Mayweather tops the list.

And yes, there was Pacquiao’s mother.

Conclusion

This fight had more storylines yet seemed to lack the hype or buzz of previous Pacquiao fights.  Nevertheless, this is one of those fights that people will find and would be willing to pay the $70 to watch.  Industry experts estimated the buy rate at 700,000 while Arum suggests a more optimistic buy rate of somewhere over 1 million.  Their last fight was 890,000.  Notwithstanding Pacquiao-Rios this past November, Manny is still a valued commodity in the boxing PPV landscape while Bradley is still an entertaining fighter on the rise.  We may just throw out that fight in Macau as an anomaly.  Perhaps I may be just bullish on Pacquiao and refuse to see the writing on the wall, but I believe that this fight will do better than their first fight and hit 1 million PPV buys.

Diaz brothers dissatisfied with pay

April 9, 2014

MMA Fighting reports that Nick Diaz will not fight in the UFC unless he receives a title shot and/or a substantial pay raise.  This comes just a day after his brother Nate spoke out about his own pay.

First, Nick Diaz was offered a fight with Hector Lombard according to Dana White at a UFC press conference on Wednesday.  Diaz told MMA Fighting that he would not consider a non-title fight “for less than $500,000.”  In the alternative, he would want a chance at Johny Hendricks for the title.  One would assume that a Hendricks fight would mean a big payday as well.  Nick Diaz’s last reported payout was at UFC 143 where he made $200,000 in a loss to Carlos Condit.  No salary was officially released for his UFC 158 fight with Georges St. Pierre although we might conclude he made a similar amount.

On Tuesday, Nate Diaz spoke out about his current salary with the UFC.  He stated that he was making $60,000 and $60,000 ($60 to show up and fight and another $60K if he won).  It’s interesting to note that Nate Diaz’s last fight at TUF Finale 18 on November 13, 2013 he made $15,000 (show) and $15,000(win) (for a total of just $30,000).  Previously, Nate Diaz had been making $50,000 just to show.  White had nothing to say Wednesday about the younger Diaz that would suggest he would give him a raise.

Payout Perspective:

The Diaz brothers at their best? Or worst?  Voicing displeasure about pay in the media is not new to sports.  One might think that the Gilbert Melendez contract has both Diaz Brothers wanting the same or similar deal.  Based on his last appearance at UFC 158, the UFC might want Nick more than Nate based on Nick being able to sell (whether knowingly or not) a fight.  As White pointed out, Nate had opportunities but some key losses (Bendo, Josh Thomson) have prevented him from making more money.

If the Diaz brothers signed contracts, its hard to argue that they deserve more money.  If they were free agents, it would be standard that a fighter would want to negotiate for more money.  Or, if the fighter was on a big win streak could there be some leverage.  Although he won 3 in a row in 2011, he has lost 2 out of the last 3 since including a title fight against Benson Henderson.  Nick Diaz has lost his last two fights since beating BJ Penn at UFC 137.  Its hard to advocate for raises on losing streaks.

Should the UFC appease the Diaz brothers?

Bellator 115 salaries: Kongo tops payroll

April 8, 2014

The MMA Report reports the salaries from Friday night’s Bellator event taking place at the Reno Events Center in Nevada.  Former UFC Heavyweight Cheick Kongo topped the payroll despite losing a unanimous decision.

The salaries disclosed were provided by the Nevada State Athletic Commission.

Vitaly Minakov: $35,000 (includes $17,500 win bonus)

Cheick Kongo: $50,000

Herman Terrado: $3,000

Justin Baesman: $3,000

Kelly Anundson: $4,000 (includes $2,000 win bonus)

Volkan Oezdemir: $4,000

Mikkel Parlo: $14,000 ( includes $7,000 win bonus)

Johnny Cisneros: $2,000

Rudy Morales: $6,000 (includes $3,000 win bonus)

Jimmy Jones: $3,000

Rick Reeves $8,000 (includes $4,000 win bonus)

James Terry: $3,000

Freddie Aquitania: $6,000 (includes $3,000 win bonus)

Josh Appelt: $6,000

Sinjen Smith: $2,000 (includes $1,000 win bonus)

Jason Powell: $1,000

Benito Lopez: $3,000 (includes $1,500 win bonus)

Oscar Ramirez: $1,000

Payout Perspective:

Kongo’s salary is a pay decrease from his days in the UFC when he averaged $70,000 to show.  We do not have information on Kongo’s first two Bellator fights.  It’s clear that the Bellator payroll is much smaller than that of the UFC as a lot of the undercard and lesser known fighters are making less than $5,000 for the fight.

UFC 170 attendance, gate, bonuses and salaries

February 22, 2014

MMA Junkie reports the attendance, gate, bonuses and salaries from UFC 170.  In the main event, Ronda Rousey stopped Sara McMann with a knee to the liver in the first round.

The attendance at the Mandalay Bay was reported at 10,217 for a live gate of $1,558,870.  In his media scrum on Thursday, Dana White indicated that the event would do a $2 million gate (around 19:15 mark).  The numbers were announced at the post-fight press conference and official numbers will be released by the Nevada State Athletic Commission next week.

As for the bonuses, which were $50,000 each:

Fight of the Night:  Rory MacDonald-Demian Maia

Performances of the Night:  Ronda Rousey, Stephen Thompson

No complaints here although Erik Koch could have earned a PON bonus.

In addition, the Nevada State Athletic Commission released the salaries for the event which reveals Daniel Cormier and Ronda Rousey topped the roster which had a total payroll of $843,000.

Via MMA Junkie:

Champ Ronda Rousey: $110,000 (includes $55,000 win bonus)
def. Sara McMann: $16,000

Daniel Cormier: $160,000 (includes $80,000 win bonus)
def. Patrick Cummins: $8,000

Rory MacDonald: $100,000 (includes $50,000 win bonus)
def. Demian Maia: $64,000

Mike Pyle: $96,000 (includes $48,000 win bonus)
def. T.J. Waldburger: $18,000

Stephen Thompson: $28,000 (includes $14,000 win bonus)
def. Robert Whittaker: $15,000

Alexis Davis: $30,000 (includes $15,000 win bonus)
def. Jessica Eye: $8,000

Raphael Assuncao: $56,000 (includes $28,000 win bonus)
def. Pedro Munhoz: $8,000

Aljamain Sterling: $16,000 (includes $8,000 win bonus)
def. Cody Gibson: $8,000

Zach Makovsky: $24,000 (includes $12,000 win bonus)
def. Josh Sampo: $10,000

Erik Koch: $30,000 (includes $15,000 win bonus)
def. Rafaello Oliveira: $14,000

Ernest Chavez: $16,000 (includes $8,000 win bonus)
def. Yosdenis Cedeno: $8,000

Payout Perspective:

As we reported earlier today, the demand for tickets for low thus despite the proclamation by White on Thursday that it would do $2.1 million was more hope than fact.  The last time a UFC PPV held an event at the Mandalay Bay, it was for UFC 156: Aldo-Edgar, which received 10,275 for a gate of $2.34 million.  So, while the attendance was about the same, it appears that Saturday utilized more comps than UFC 156.  We will learn more when the official numbers are released by the NSAC.  Rousey ends up tied with Daniel Cormier for highest reported earner of the night as she also received a $50K bonus in addition to her show/win purse.  Patrick Cummins received $8K for filling in late.

MMA Payout will have more on UFC 170 in its Payout Perspective.  Stay tuned.

UFC 170 pre-fight presser scrum focuses on fighter pay & sponsorships

February 22, 2014

UFC President Dana White discussed several topics during the UFC 170 pre-fight presser scrum, notably an update on the current status of Gilbert Melendez and recent fighter complains about fighter pay and sponsorships.

 

“It’s not my f— problem,” White told Iole and the media. “Getting sponsorship is a problem. It’s tough. It’s hard to do. That question is ridiculous. If a guy fights on Fight Pass, first of all, he’s getting paid to fight. That’s what he’s getting paid for. That’s what he does. How sponsorship works out for a guy is not my problem. That is not my problem. He’s a fighter, he gets paid to fight, period, end of story. Whatever extra money he makes outside of the UFC with sponsors and all that s—, that’s his f— deal.”

Link: MMAFighting.com

 

Payout Perspective:

Dana White came under a lot of heat during the scrum, specifically on the topics of fighter pay and sponsorships.  During the scrum, White’s insistence that fighters sponsorship money was not his problem troubled a number of fighters and media members.  MMAFighting’s Luke Thomas solid piece in response to White’s tirade titled “Actually, fighter sponsorships are the UFC’s problem” hit the nail on the head.  The UFC is now saying that this is not their problem now, but they have previously trumpeted fighter sponsorship as a rebuttal for fighters not getting paid enough.  They have also created an environment for fighters which makes it very difficult for sponsors to jump on board after paying a sponsor fee and determining how many viewers their brand will actually reach.

At a time when UFC has broken into a certain level of mainstream in the US after monumental TV deals with FOX, Globo, and other major sponsors, fighters are finding it now harder than ever to find sponsors.  As the article points out, there are many contributing factors that led to the current situation, but nearly all were self-inflicted by the UFC.  Specifically, the creation of the sponsor tax  and the banning of multiple lower-end sponsors have really hurt a large percentage of lower end fighters. In addition to the restrictions placed on the fighter-sponsor relationship, the UFC has continued to place it’s product on media platforms that have continued to drop in viewership and exposure throughout the years, such as the move from Spike TV, to FX & Fuel TV, to now FS1, FS2, and Fight Pass.

One of the biggest concerns right now for fighters is being placed on a Fight Pass card, which typically takes place out of the country with a limited stream viewership.  MMAJunkie’s Steve Morocco got a glimpse of what a fighter has to consider now when taking a fight as he spoke to UFC fighter Zach Makovsky.

“They were like, ‘You can turn it down and we can get you on later, but that could be on a card on Fight Pass in Brazil, against a Brazilian,’” Makovsky said. Such a booking would have brought a hit to his pocket book in the form of flying his coaches to the fight and selling sponsors on the still-developing digital network. “I think this was the best scenario,” Makovsky said. “I always wanted to fight in Vegas.”

There is no denying that the UFC is looking towards the future with the sponsorship tax fee, the rumored uniform, and the the Fight Pass digital network.  It does not appear that they were quite ready yet to make this transition as they are cutting the bottom half assuming that they will reap from the top, which does not appear to be the case yet. It may also not be the case 5 years from now and may take longer than they have anticipated, but they must workout some type of agreement with the fighters before the benefits of becoming an MMA fighter start to appear less and less beneficial for the lower end fighters.

Johnson tops WSOF 8 Salaries

January 23, 2014

The MMA Report reports the salaries for the World Series of Fighting 8 as disclosed by the Florida Boxing Commission.  Anthony Johnson topped the overall payroll for this past Saturday’s event.

Johnson made a reported $75,000 ($40,000 show/$35,000 win) for his KO victory over Mike Kyle ($10,000).  The second highest paid fighters for the night was Justin Gaethje who made $30,000 ($15,000 show/$15,000 win) as he defeated Rich Patishnock ($6,000) and Jessica Aguliar ($15K/$15K) as she defeated Alida Gray ($5,000).

The rest of the card pay is as follows:

Cody Bollinger: $20,000 (includes $10,000 win bonus)

Tyson Nam: $6,000

Luis Palomino: $14,000 (includes $7,000 win bonus)

Jorge Patino: $8,000

Tyler Stinson: $10,000 (includes $5,000 win bonus)

Valdir Araujo: $10,000

Derrick Mehman: $10,000 (includes $5,000 win bonus)

Scott Barrett: $5,000

Alexis Vila: $7,000 (includes $4,000 win bonus)

Sidemar Honorio: $2,000

Freddy Assuncao: $6,000 (includes $3,000 win bonus)

Brenson Hansen: $6,000

Anderson Melo: $2,000 (includes $1,000 win bonus)

Jose Caceres: $2,000

Payout Perspective:

Decent pay for Johnson as the ex-UFC welterweight is getting paid like one of the top fighters in the organization.  The mid-card fighters made adequate pay with the lower tier fighters make minimal.

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