UFC 154 PPV buy estimates between 680-700K

November 29, 2012

MMA Fighting reports that GSP’s return to UFC 154 garnered between 680,000 to 700,000 PPV buys.  During the UFC’s Conference Call this past Tuesday Dana White sounded pleased with the PPV buys as he called GSP the “PPV King.”

The estimated buy rate would be the highest since Silva-Sonnen II this past July.  That event received 925,000 PPV buys.  If the UFC 154 PPV buy rate holds true, it would be slightly below the PPV buy rates of GSP’s previous fights with Jake Shields (800K), Josh Koscheck (800K) and Dan Hardy (770K).

GSP’s biggest PPV buy occurred in January 2009 when he fought BJ Penn.  UFC 94 grabbed 925,000 PPV buys.

Payout Perspective:

The PPV buy estimates for UFC 154 are good if you consider that the UFC pushed showing the event in theatres.  This was backed by the UFC promoting fighter appearances at the select theaters across the country.  Despite the low ratings for its Prelims and the ticket sales/attendance, the PPV buy rates appear solid.

11 Responses to “UFC 154 PPV buy estimates between 680-700K”

  1. Tim on November 29th, 2012 11:46 PM

    Good number. But I think it fair to say that the growth of UFC has stagnated, at best, and is probably decreasing. Looking back at the PPV numbers from 2009-10, you would have thougt that the big PPVs in 2012 would have been a lot bigger than they have been. We all thought the sky was the limit back then. Now we’re happy with a lot less than we had.

  2. Jackwio on November 30th, 2012 12:02 AM

    i don’t see how anyone can spin these numbers as being good.

    for starters 680k-700k was lower then gsp’s last few fights.

    second,due to the long lay off and the excitement of his return it was expected ufc 154 would generate 800k-1m buys.

    third its also known that the the arena did’nt sell out, pulling in a smaller live gate then last time gsp faught there.

    these numbers further confirm that the UFC is in trouble. as even gsp’s popularity seems to be fading.

    perhaps mma is the fastest dying sport in the world?

  3. Sampson Simpson on November 30th, 2012 6:38 AM

    400k from the U.S.

    Chavez-Martinez did 475k from the U.S.

  4. Sampson Simpson on November 30th, 2012 6:38 AM

    400k from the U.S.

    Chavez-Martinez did 475k from the U.S.

  5. Sampson Simpson on November 30th, 2012 6:38 AM

    400k from the U.S.

    Chavez-Martinez did 475k from the U.S.

  6. Jason Cruz on November 30th, 2012 9:03 AM

    @SampsonSimpson

    I think Chavez-Martinez had more hype and there was more ill will used to promote the fight.

    Of course, it did go up against Canelo across town.

  7. mmaguru on November 30th, 2012 10:29 AM

    GSP PPV would do really well in Canada. Most likely 20 to 30% of the buys were up north.

  8. Dfdfdfd on December 1st, 2012 5:50 PM

    1.] GSP reportedly earns $8M per fight
    2.] GSP makes $15M per year from sponsors…

    Interesting note:

    GSP camp requests $50M for Silva fight…

  9. Diego on December 3rd, 2012 11:49 AM

    A solid number but it does seem like we’ve hit the PPV ceiling in North America and are slightly off peak. Considering the hype from the move to Fox I think Zuffa would have expected to be hitting new peaks this year. Next year will be telling for MMA as the Fox deal matures and Bellator moves to Spike. It feels like the sport is pretty much as big as it’s going to get short of penetrating new regional markets.

  10. Sampson Simpson on December 4th, 2012 10:10 AM

    Bellator should have an impact in 2013 for sure. Look for them to sign old UFC names and build the brand quickly

  11. CodeMaster on December 5th, 2012 4:44 PM

    The PPV number is very good considering the economic climate. The UFC charges a lot for live seats–and the PPV model is in transition. GSP alone is very popular, but the UFC tends to not support GSP with good cards–they did so at UFC 129. Condit may have been built up as a viable and dangerous contender, but fans were not so enthused with the match-up.

    The UFC needs to build more stars–and the Fox pre-game human interest focus on the UFC Fox 5 was slick and well-shot, boding well for future marketing penetration.

    As I have stated before, understanding the UFC business model and its success is not measured solely by PPV numbers. The PPV numbers are very deceptive. The UFC is seen legally and illegally in many more homes and restaurant/bars globally than the PPV numbers would suggest. That means that advertising dollars have more bang for their buck.

    We are seeing better cards on Fox–as the UFC brass recognize and respond to what many have been saying: The cards were too watered down.

    What is the lesson? Fans recognize quality and value–and want to see big cards on Fox, and on PPV.

    The UFC is currently in a long, slow transition to free TV. The organizaton needs to continue to invest in building stars, and telling fans who these fighters are. Once a Name is built, they can headline and support the main card. In the midst of expansion, they should not forget who brought them to the dance.

    I don’t know how much the UFC Is receiving from its global enterprises–like Brazil, UK, Australia, etc, but I am pretty certain it is significant loot, and the potential for a lot more is evident. In Brazil, many see UFC PPV cards free, as do UK fans.

    Those Cassandras who predict the imminent demise of the UFC seem to base their opinions on wishful thinking instead of sound, balanced analysis.

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